Coming of Age in Mississippi | Study Guide

Anne Moody

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Download Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Coming of Age in Mississippi Study Guide." Course Hero. 16 Oct. 2017. Web. 13 Dec. 2017. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Coming-of-Age-in-Mississippi/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2017, October 16). Coming of Age in Mississippi Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved December 13, 2017, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Coming-of-Age-in-Mississippi/

In text

(Course Hero, 2017)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Coming of Age in Mississippi Study Guide." October 16, 2017. Accessed December 13, 2017. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Coming-of-Age-in-Mississippi/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Coming of Age in Mississippi Study Guide," October 16, 2017, accessed December 13, 2017, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Coming-of-Age-in-Mississippi/.

Coming of Age in Mississippi | Civil Rights Movement Timeline

Share
Share

1865: The Thirteenth Amendment abolishes slavery in the United States.

1868: The Fourteenth Amendment guarantees "equal protection rights" to all citizens.

1870: The Fifteenth Amendment gives all male citizens the right to vote.

1896: The Plessy v. Ferguson case sets a precedent for racial segregation in public facilities.

1910: The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is founded.

1941: A. Philip Randolph calls for a march on Washington to end discrimination in war industries and to integrate the military.

1942: The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) is founded in Chicago.

1954: The Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka case ends legal racial segregation in public schools.

1955: Black Chicago resident Emmett Till is murdered in Mississippi after flirting with a white woman.

1955–56: Dr. King leads the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Alabama.

1957: Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, is desegregated.

February 1960: Black students participate in a Woolworth's sit-in in Greensboro, North Carolina.

April 1960: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) is founded by sit-in leaders on the campus of Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

1961: The Freedom Riders travel to the South on interstate buses to protest segregation.

1964: Civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner are murdered in Mississippi.

1962: The Council of Federated Organizations (COFO), an umbrella of civil rights groups, is founded in Mississippi.

1962: The Bailey v. Patterson case makes segregated transportation facilities illegal.

October 1962: The University of Mississippi admits its first black student, James Meredith.

1963: Law enforcement uses violence on peaceful demonstrators in Birmingham, Alabama.

May 1963: Activists participate in a Woolworth's sit-in in Jackson, Mississippi.

June 1963: Civil rights leader Medgar Evers is assassinated in Jackson, Mississippi.

August 1963: Civil rights activists gather for the March on Washington; Dr. King makes his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.

September 1963: The 16th Street Baptist Church is bombed in Alabama, killing four young girls.

November 1963: Kennedy is assassinated in Dallas, Texas.

January 1964: The Twenty-Fourth Amendment is ratified, making poll taxes illegal.

July 1964: The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination in public facilities.

Summer 1964: CORE and COFO activists gather for the Freedom Summer to increase black voter registration.

December 1964: Dr. King receives the Nobel Peace Prize.

February 1965: Malcolm X is assassinated in New York City.

August 6, 1965: The Voting Rights Act of 1965 outlaws discriminatory voting practices.

August 11–16, 1965: The Watts riots take place in Los Angeles.

1968: Dr. King is assassinated in Memphis.

Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about Coming of Age in Mississippi? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!

Download Study Guide
Ask a homework question - tutors are online