Common Sense | Study Guide

Thomas Paine

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Common Sense Study Guide." Course Hero. 10 Nov. 2017. Web. 20 Sep. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Common-Sense/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2017, November 10). Common Sense Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved September 20, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Common-Sense/

In text

(Course Hero, 2017)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Common Sense Study Guide." November 10, 2017. Accessed September 20, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Common-Sense/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Common Sense Study Guide," November 10, 2017, accessed September 20, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Common-Sense/.

Overview

Common Sense infographic thumbnail

Author

Thomas Paine

Year Published

1776

Type

Primary Source

Genre

History

At a Glance

Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense to persuade colonial Americans of the value of independence from Great Britain. Before the pamphlet was published on January 10, 1776, few of the colonists—including prominent political leaders such as Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, and George Washington—were even thinking about separating from England. Paine's initial 46-page text not only opened the door for conversations about independence but also laid the groundwork for the structure of the United States' representative form of government. As one of the defining documents of American history, Common Sense is a reminder of how and why the original 13 colonies gained their independence.

About the Title

The title Common Sense refers to the logical reasoning Paine uses to explain why the American colonies should separate from Great Britain. He initially wanted to call his pamphlet Plain Truth, but he was persuaded by Dr. Benjamin Rush—a young, radical member of the Continental Congress and a dear friend—to take the name from the opening line of Part 3: In the following pages I offer nothing more than simple facts, plain arguments, and common sense.

Summary

This study guide and infographic for Thomas Paine's Common Sense offer summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

Buy this book from Amazon.com
Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about Common Sense? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!