Literature Study GuidesDeclaration Of Sentiments

Declaration of Sentiments | Study Guide

Elizabeth Stanton

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MLA

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Course Hero. "Declaration of Sentiments Study Guide." Course Hero. 22 Aug. 2018. Web. 10 Dec. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Declaration-of-Sentiments/>.

In text

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APA

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Course Hero. (2018, August 22). Declaration of Sentiments Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved December 10, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Declaration-of-Sentiments/

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Chicago

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Course Hero. "Declaration of Sentiments Study Guide." August 22, 2018. Accessed December 10, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Declaration-of-Sentiments/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Declaration of Sentiments Study Guide," August 22, 2018, accessed December 10, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Declaration-of-Sentiments/.

Overview

Author

Elizabeth Stanton

Year Written

1848

Type

Primary Source

Genre

History, Speech

At a Glance

  • This text describes the legal and social position of women in the United States in the mid-19th century and calls for radical changes.
  • Modeled on the Declaration of Independence, it argues that the signers are justified in their call to resist their government.
  • It was a central document of the Seneca Falls Convention in New York, a meeting called to demand rights for women.
  • It was signed by 68 women and 32 men.
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote most of the text, with input from fellow activists Lucretia Mott, Martha Wright, Mary Ann M'Clintock, and Jane Hunt.
  • Most Seneca Falls Convention attendees were antislavery activists. They modeled their work on their experience in the abolition movement.
  • There was significant backlash to the Declaration of Sentiments, also known as the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments. Several signers retracted their support due to the harsh criticism. Yet many heeded the call to action. Numerous women's rights conventions were organized throughout the country, with a major national conference in 1850.
  • The Declaration of Sentiments continues to represent a milestone in the history of women's rights.

Summary

This study guide for Elizabeth Stanton's Declaration of Sentiments offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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