Literature Study GuidesDeclaration Of The Rights Of Woman And Of The Female Citizen 1791

Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen (1791) | Study Guide

Olympe de Gouges

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Course Hero. "Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen (1791) Study Guide." Course Hero. 23 Aug. 2019. Web. 18 Sep. 2019. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Declaration-of-the-Rights-of-Woman-and-of-the-Female-Citizen-1791/>.

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Course Hero. (2019, August 23). Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen (1791) Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved September 18, 2019, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Declaration-of-the-Rights-of-Woman-and-of-the-Female-Citizen-1791/

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Course Hero. "Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen (1791) Study Guide." August 23, 2019. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Declaration-of-the-Rights-of-Woman-and-of-the-Female-Citizen-1791/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen (1791) Study Guide," August 23, 2019, accessed September 18, 2019, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Declaration-of-the-Rights-of-Woman-and-of-the-Female-Citizen-1791/.

Overview

Author

Olympe de Gouges

Year Published

1791

Type

Primary Source

Genre

History, Women's Studies

At a Glance

  • Olympe de Gouges (1748–93) wrote the Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen as a response to and criticism of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (1789).
  • Both declarations were written in the context of the French Revolution, which broke out in 1789.
  • Gouges was particularly outraged that the male delegates to the new French National Assembly would not permit women to serve as delegates.
  • Gouges's text uses the structure and language of the Declaration of the Rights of Man, changing some of the wording to call for rights for women.
  • The Declaration of the Rights of Woman reflects the influence of Enlightenment ideas, such as the concept of natural rights and the importance of reason.
  • The Declaration of the Rights of Woman includes some particular concerns that Gouges had long fought for, such as the right of unmarried women to name the fathers of their children.
  • In a postscript, Gouges calls for women to "wake up" and fight for the rights that the men of the Revolution are denying them.
  • Gouges's declaration also includes a new marriage contract, specifying greater property rights for women.
  • Gouges was a successful writer who called for rights for women, children, the poor, and other groups. She was a passionate advocate for the abolition of slavery.
  • Gouges was executed in 1793 during the Reign of Terror, when her political rivals within the revolution rose to power.

Summary

This study guide for Olympe de Gouges's Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen (1791) offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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