Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Drown Study Guide." Course Hero. 14 June 2019. Web. 16 July 2019. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Drown/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2019, June 14). Drown Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved July 16, 2019, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Drown/

In text

(Course Hero, 2019)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Drown Study Guide." June 14, 2019. Accessed July 16, 2019. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Drown/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Drown Study Guide," June 14, 2019, accessed July 16, 2019, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Drown/.

Overview

Author

Junot Díaz

Year Published

1996

Type

Short Stories

Genre

Fiction

At a Glance

Drown was Junot Díaz's first published collection. It received generally good reviews on its release and was strongly and positively reappraised after the success of his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007).

Perspective and Narrator

Most of the stories in Drown are narrated in the first person. Exceptions are "How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie," which is written in the second person, and "No Face," which is written in the third person.

Tense

Most of the stories in Drown are written in the past tense. The stories "Aurora," "Drown," and "Edison, New Jersey" are written mostly in present tense, with past tense used for flashbacks. "How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie" is written in present tense, with occasional future tense sentences used for prediction.

About the Title

Drown is the title of one of the short stories as well as the entire collection. The story "Drown" uses a community swimming pool as a metaphor for the main character's submersion in a friendship that causes confusion about his own identity. Drown as a title for the entire collection implies that the people surrounding the main character throughout his life drag him down, keeping him from realizing his potential as a human being.

Summary

This study guide for Junot Díaz's Drown offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

Buy this book from Amazon.com
Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about Drown? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!