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Emma | Infographic

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Check out this Infographic to learn more about Jane Austen's Emma. Study visually with character maps, plot summaries, helpful context, and more.

Jane Austen1815EnglishNovel AuthorYear PublishedOriginal LanguageEmmaRomanceFRIENDSSUSPICIOUS OFATTRACTED TOEmmaHeroineJane FairfaxOutsiderFrank ChurchillNative sonMr. EltonVicarMr. KnightleyGentlemanMARRIESKIND TOMARRIESHarriet SmithInnocent friendATTRACTED TOJEALOUS OFATTRACTED TOFLIRTS WITHMAIN CHARACTERSTrial and Error in the Game of LoveAn ensemble of characters living in the English countryside face various trials and tribulations because of repeated misreadings of other people’s romantic intentions. The heroine takes a disastrous turn at matchmaking, while a returned native son hides his true love interest. The story ends happily in several promises of marriage.Choice of partner is dictated by class, beauty, wealth, and affection, making it hard to make the right choice.When characters face up to their flaws, they mature in their understanding and happiness.A woman’s livelihood and ability to make choices are constrained by the necessity to marry well.MarriageSelf-knowledgeGenderThemesJANE AUSTEN 1775-1817This English novelist closely observed the morals and manners of the landed gentry and portrayed women’s dilemma of dependence on men for status and livelihood. She predicted her character Emma would be "a heroine whom no one but myself will much like."AuthorEmma and Harriet collect riddles, symbolizing the games people play and the resulting misunderstandings.Mr. Knightley prefers walking to riding in a carriage, symbolizing his rejection of airs and graces.Even down to his name, he is the perfect gentleman and knight in shining armor.Book of Riddles Riding vs. WalkingMr. Knightley's NameSymbolsEmmaby the NumbersDistance from the fictional Highbury to London16 milesTime Emma had Miss Taylor as a governess and companion16 yearsApproximate age difference between Emma and Mr. Knightley16Narrator,Chapter 49eldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken; but where...the feelings are not, it may not be very material.Sources: The Guardian, Jane Austen Society, PenguinCopyright © 2016 Course Hero, Inc.

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