HomeLiterature Study GuidesFahrenheit 451Part 3 Montag Goes On The Run Summary

Fahrenheit 451 | Study Guide

Ray Bradbury

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Fahrenheit 451 Study Guide." Course Hero. 10 Aug. 2016. Web. 21 Feb. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fahrenheit-451/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2016, August 10). Fahrenheit 451 Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved February 21, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fahrenheit-451/

In text

(Course Hero, 2016)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Fahrenheit 451 Study Guide." August 10, 2016. Accessed February 21, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fahrenheit-451/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Fahrenheit 451 Study Guide," August 10, 2016, accessed February 21, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fahrenheit-451/.

Part 3 | Montag Goes on the Run

Course Hero’s video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Part 3 | Burning Bright (Montag Goes on the Run) of Ray Bradbury's novel Fahrenheit 451.

Fahrenheit 451 | Part 3 (Montag Goes on the Run) : Burning Bright | Summary

Share
Share

Summary

After rescuing some books from his yard, Montag runs away, although his leg is in pain. As he flees he realizes Beatty wanted to die. He finds his Seashell Radio, and when he puts it in his ear, he hears announcements about his escape as the public is told to look for him. He visits a gas station, where he washes off in the bathroom, and then goes on. He sees a car going faster and faster, getting louder and louder, and is sure it is coming for him. He tries to go faster but falls over. The car speeds past without hitting him or stopping, and he realizes it was a few kids joyriding.

Analysis

Montag realizes he has a second identity as the Montag created to terrorize and titillate the public. When he puts the Seashell Radio in his ear, he hears news broadcasts warning people to watch for "a man running." His Seashell also connects Montag to the larger world, since as he is running he hears an announcement that war has been declared. This is an example of dramatic irony, since Montag is at war with his own society.

When the car almost runs Montag over he thinks "I'm done! It's over." His fall reminds him of how Clarisse possibly died, as he wonders if the same car ran her over. His thoughts link him to Clarisse as he takes up her cause.

Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about Fahrenheit 451? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!

Ask a homework question - tutors are online