Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen (Selected) | Study Guide

Hans Christian Andersen

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Course Hero. "Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen (Selected) Study Guide." Course Hero. 6 Oct. 2017. Web. 19 July 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fairy-Tales-of-Hans-Christian-Andersen-Selected/>.

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Course Hero. (2017, October 6). Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen (Selected) Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved July 19, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fairy-Tales-of-Hans-Christian-Andersen-Selected/

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Course Hero. "Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen (Selected) Study Guide." October 6, 2017. Accessed July 19, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fairy-Tales-of-Hans-Christian-Andersen-Selected/.

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Course Hero, "Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen (Selected) Study Guide," October 6, 2017, accessed July 19, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fairy-Tales-of-Hans-Christian-Andersen-Selected/.

Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen (Selected) | Characters

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Character Description
The little mermaid The little mermaid is the main character in the story "The Little Mermaid." She is loving, gentle, beautiful, sensitive, graceful, and determined. Read More
Gerda Gerda is the main character in the story "The Snow Queen." Gerda is sweet, kind, innocent of malice, loving, and filled with inner strength and resilience. Read More
Karen Karen is the main character in the story "The Red Shoes." Vain, self-absorbed, arrogant, careless, and selfish at first, Karen learns humility and an attitude of appreciation by the end of the story. Read More
Thumbelina Thumbelina is the main character in the story "Thumbelina." A tiny girl, she is sweet, innocent, resourceful, kind, compassionate, and brave. Read More
Elisa Elisa is the main character in the story "The Wild Swans." She is loving, gentle, determined, faithful, truthful, and hardworking. Read More
The little match girl The little match girl is the main character in the story "The Little Match Girl." She is lost, ignored, uncomplaining, and imaginative. Read More
The emperor of China The emperor of China is the main character in the story "The Nightingale." He is confident, strong, powerful, and (finally) gracious. Read More
John John is the main character in the story "The Traveling Companion." He is strong, simple, natural, kind, compassionate, friendly, and sympathetic. Read More
The ugly duckling The ugly duckling is the main character in the story "The Ugly Duckling." The ugly duckling is shy, awkward, timid, self-depreciating, and miserable at first, but then confident, strong, and happy. Read More
The Snow Queen The heartless and beautiful Snow Queen is the antagonist in the story "The Snow Queen." Read More
The angel The angel in "The Red Shoes" both curses Karen to dance and grants her respite by allowing her to die in peace.
The archbishop The archbishop in "The Wild Swans" unfairly condemns the main character, Elisa.
The bachelor of theology The bachelor of theology in "The Galoshes of Fortune" speaks with Councilor Knap and confuses him.
Bae the reindeer Bae the reindeer in "The Snow Queen" brings Gerda to the Snow Queen's palace.
The ball The ball in "The Sweethearts" thinks she is finer than the top, who wants to be her sweetheart.
Big Claus Big Claus in "Little Claus and Big Claus" is richer than Little Claus, but not very clever.
Black Bogey Black Bogey in "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" is a rival with the soldier for the attentions of the paper doll dancer.
The boy The boy in "The Old House" gives the old man a tin soldier so he will not be lonely.
The cattle drover The cattle drover in "Little Claus and Big Claus" is tired of living and gives Little Claus all his cattle.
The child The child in "The Child in the Grave" teaches his grieving mother a lesson about accepting death.
The old Chinaman The old Chinaman is a character in the story "The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep." When the two lovers elope, he falls and breaks his back.
The copying clerk The copying clerk in "The Galoshes of Fortune" becomes confused when he puts on the galoshes and is transformed into a lark.
Councilor Knap Councilor Knap is a character in the story "The Galoshes of Fortune." When he puts the galoshes on, he finds the city is much better in its modern day than in its medieval period.
Dame Care Dame Care in "The Galoshes of Fortune" is an older fairy who is certain no one will get any good out of the galoshes.
Dame Fortune Dame Fortune in "The Galoshes of Fortune" is a fairy who does not directly appear in the story. Instead, her assistant does her work for her.
Dame Fortune's assistant Dame Fortune's assistant in "The Galoshes of Fortune" delivers "the more trifling gifts" of Fortune.
The daughters of the air The daughters of the air in "The Little Mermaid" teach the little mermaid how to gain an immortal soul.
Death in "The Child in the Grave" Death in "The Child in the Grave" allows the mother to visit her dead child.
Death in "The Nightingale" Death in "The Nightingale" succumbs to the sweet singing of the nightingale.
The 11 brothers The 11 brothers in "The Wild Swans" are princes only at night. In the daytime they are wild swans as the result of an enchantment.
The emperor The emperor in "The Emperor's New Clothes" is extremely vain. It takes the honesty of a little child to make him see his new clothes do not exist.
The evil men The evil men in "The Traveling Companion" try to abuse the body of a dead man who owes money to them. They are stopped by John.
The executioner The executioner in "The Red Shoes" cuts off Karen's feet inside the red shoes.
The farmer The farmer in "Little Claus and Big Claus" is easily tricked into believing the sexton is the Devil. He begs Little Claus to take the sexton away.
The farmer's wife The farmer's wife in "Little Claus and Big Claus" is caught entertaining the sexton by Little Claus. She then must provide supper to Little Claus and the farmer.
The fat storyteller The fat storyteller in "The Fir Tree" amuses the children of the house by telling stories at Christmas.
The field mouse The field mouse in "Thumbelina" tries to convince Thumbelina to marry the mole.
The Finn woman The Finn woman in "The Snow Queen" helps Gerda find the palace of the Snow Queen.
The fir tree The fir tree in "The Fir Tree" learns being a Christmas tree is exciting, but it doesn't last very long.
The five sea princesses The five sea princesses in "The Little Mermaid" cut off their hair so the little mermaid can return to the sea.
The forest crow The forest crow in "The Snow Queen" helps Gerda find her way to the palace.
General Headquarters-Hindquarters-Gives-Orders-Front-and-Rear-Sergeant-Billygoat-Legs General Headquarters-Hindquarters-Gives-Orders-Front-and-Rear-Sergeant-Billygoat-Legs is a character in the story "The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep." Because he is made of wood, the old Chinaman thinks he would make a great husband for the shepherdess.
The grandmother in "Little Claus and Big Claus" The grandmother in "Little Claus and Big Claus" dies, and subsequently, Little Claus makes the innkeeper think he's the one who killed her.
The grandmother in "The Little Match Girl" The grandmother in "The Little Match Girl" appears as a spirit in the flame of a match to take the little match girl with her to heaven.
The grandmother in "The Little Mermaid" The grandmother in "The Little Mermaid" explains how land creatures, especially humans, are different than merfolk.
The grandmother in "The Snow Queen" The grandmother in "The Snow Queen" tells Kay and Gerda stories about the Snow Queen.
The guardian The guardian in "The Red Shoes" adopts Karen as her ward after Karen's mother dies.
Hajmar Hajmar in "Ole Lukoie" is a good child to whom Ole Lukoie tells wonderful stories.
The hobgoblin The hobgoblin in "The Snow Queen" creates an evil mirror that shatters, setting the story's events in motion.
The hospital intern The hospital intern in "The Galoshes of Fortune" finds his wish gets him stuck in a fence. He is also able to see into the hearts of people when he wears the galoshes.
Ida Ida in "Little Ida's Flowers" learns the reason her flowers are wilted is because they were out dancing all night.
The innkeeper The innkeeper in "Little Claus and Big Claus" is terrified to think he killed the grandmother of Little Claus.
John John in "The Traveling Companion" displays a straightforward honesty that wins him a princess for a bride.
Kay Kay is a character in the story "The Snow Queen." Because a shard of the evil mirror is in his eye and his heart, he treats Gerda badly and doesn't resist being captured by the Snow Queen.
The king in "The Swineherd" The king in "The Swineherd" finds his daughter kissing the swineherd and casts them both out.
The king in "The Tinder Box" The king in "The Tinder Box" is tossed by the dogs when he tries to prevent the princess from marrying the soldier.
The kitchen girl The kitchen girl in "The Nightingale" shows the emperor's court where to find the nightingale.
The ladies of the chamber The ladies of the chamber in "The Swineherd" hide the princess while the swineherd is collecting kisses.
The Lapp woman The Lapp woman in "The Snow Queen" directs Gerda to the Finn woman.
The lieutenant The lieutenant in "The Galoshes of Fortune" trades bodies with the watchman, but neither likes his new condition, so they trade back.
The little boy The little boy in "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" inexplicably throws the tin soldier into the hearth fire.
The little child The little child in "The Emperor's New Clothes" is the only character honest enough to say the emperor isn't wearing any clothes.
Little Claus Little Claus in "Little Claus and Big Claus" manages to trick Big Claus over and over and ends up wealthy.
The mayfly The mayfly is a character in "Thumbelina." It takes Thumbelina to the other mayflies, who make fun of her.
The mice The mice in "The Fir Tree" trade stories with the Fir Tree while it is stored in the attic.
The mole The mole in "Thumbelina" is wealthy and wants to marry Thumbelina.
The mother The mother is a character in the story "The Child in the Grave." Her grief is inconsolable until she is able to visit her dead child.
The mother duck The mother duck in "The Ugly Duckling" raises the ugly duckling until he is forced to leave the barnyard.
The mysterious lady The mysterious lady in "The Wild Swans" tells Elisa how to free her brothers from their spell.
The nightingale The nightingale in "The Nightingale" sings for the emperor and saves him from Death.
The old duck The old duck in "The Ugly Duckling" is venerated by all the barnyard animals.
The old man The old man in "The Old House" enjoys the companionship of his young neighbor.
The old mother shoemaker The old mother shoemaker in "The Red Shoes" makes Karen a pair of red slippers out of scraps.
The old queen The old queen in "The Princess and the Pea" proves the princess is genuine by putting a pea under the mattresses of the bed.
The old soldier The old soldier in "The Red Shoes" taps Karen's red shoes and tells them to never stop dancing.
The old woman in "The Snow Queen" The old woman in "The Snow Queen" tries to keep Gerda as her own child.
The old woman in "The Ugly Duckling" The old woman in "The Ugly Duckling" owns the home in which the ugly duckling takes temporary refuge.
Ole Lukoie Ole Lukoie in "Ole Lukoie" brings sweet dreams to good children and nightmares to bad ones.
The palace crow The palace crow in "The Snow Queen" helps Gerda get into the palace to meet the prince and princess.
The paper doll dancer The paper doll dancer in "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" stands on one foot, like the soldier, but is far less durable than he.
The poor prince The poor prince in "The Swineherd" is disgusted with the pettiness of the princess he wants to marry. He trades trinkets for her kisses.
The porcelain chimney sweep The porcelain chimney sweep in "The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep" does his best to help the porcelain shepherdess to escape with him into the wide world.
The porcelain shepherdess The porcelain shepherdess in "The Shepherdess and the Chimney-Sweep" wants to run away with the porcelain chimney sweep, but the effort is too much for her.
The portrait of great-grandfather The portrait of great-grandfather in "Ole Lukoie" disapproves of Ole Lukoie telling fanciful stories, but approves of the moral of a lesson.
The prince in "The Little Mermaid" The prince in "The Little Mermaid" is unaware the little mermaid loves him, but he is nevertheless fond of her.
The prince in "The Snow Queen" The prince in "The Snow Queen" works with the princess to help Gerda in her search for Kay.
The princess in "The Little Mermaid" The princess in "The Little Mermaid" finds the prince on the shore, and he thinks it was she who saved him.
The princess in "The Princess and the Pea" The princess in "The Princess and the Pea" is a genuine princess because she can feel a pea buried under many mattresses.
The princess in "The Shadow" The princess in "The Shadow" is completely fooled by the sophistication of the shadow and marries him believing he is a real man.
The princess in "The Snow Queen" The princess in "The Snow Queen" helps Gerda in her search for Kay, along with the prince.
The princess in "The Swineherd" The princess in "The Swineherd" would rather give a swineherd kisses in exchange for trinkets than accept the real gifts of a prince.
The princess in "The Tinder Box" The princess in "The Tinder Box" is kept under lock and key so a soldier will not marry her, but he does anyway.
The princess in "The Traveling Companion" The princess in "The Traveling Companion" is under an evil spell until it is broken by the stranger.
The prosy councilor The prosy councilor in "Little Ida's Flowers" thinks the student's story is nonsense, but Little Ida knows better.
The queen The queen in "The Tinderbox" is tossed in the air by the dogs.
The robbers The robbers in "The Snow Queen" take away all the fine things the prince and princess gave to Gerda.
The robber girl The robber girl in "The Snow Queen" spares Gerda's life and gives Bae to her as a guide.
The scholar The scholar in "The Shadow" gives his shadow his freedom. The shadow subsequently becomes more like a man, and the scholar becomes more like a shadow.
The sea witch The sea witch in "The Little Mermaid" gives the little mermaid a potion that will make her legs grow in exchange for her voice.
The sexton The sexton in "Little Claus and Big Claus" is mistaken by the farmer to be the devil. He bribes Little Claus into letting him go.
The shadow The shadow in "The Shadow" develops into a sophisticated image of a man so convincing people take him for a real man.
The snow man The snow man in "The Snow Man" falls in love with a stove, not realizing her heat would melt him.
The soldier The soldier in "The Tinder Box" not only gains the wealth of the chests in the tree, but also possesses the tinder box that summons the dogs.
The stranger The stranger in "The Traveling Companion" travels with John and helps him win the princess to thank John for saving his body from the evil men.
The student in "The Galoshes of Fortune" The student in "The Galoshes of Fortune" is the only character who wears the galoshes and is happy with the realization of his wishes.
The student in "Little Ida's Flowers" The student in "Little Ida's Flowers" shows Ida how her flowers dance all night, making them wilted by morning.
The swallow The swallow in "Thumbelina" takes Thumbelina away with him and sets her down in a flower.
The swans The swans in "The Ugly Duckling" admire the new swan that the ugly duckling becomes at last.
The swindlers The swindlers in "The Emperor's New Clothes" pretend to sew new clothes for the emperor.
The three dogs The three dogs in "The Tinder Box" bring the soldier anything he wishes when he strikes the tinder box.
The tin soldier in "The Old House" The tin soldier in "The Old House" objects to being in the house and gets lost until he is found by the young wife.
The tin soldier in "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" The tin soldier in "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" has a love for the paper doll dancer that doesn't waver despite many trials.
The tiny king The tiny king in "Thumbelina" is the spirit of the flower to which the swallow brings Thumbelina.
The toad The toad in "Thumbelina" is wealthy and wants Thumbelina to marry him.
The top The top in "The Sweethearts" is in love with the ball.
The two evil men The two evil men in "The Traveling Companion" try to cast out the body of the man who owed them money, until John stops them and pays the debt.
The ugly old witch The ugly old witch in "The Tinderbox" gets the soldier to retrieve the tinder box, but when she won't tell him why she wants it, he cuts off her head.
The watchdog The watchdog in "The Snow Man" tells the snow man to stay away from the stove that is sure to melt him.
The watchman The watchman in "The Galoshes of Fortune" has a terrible night as a result of his adventures with the galoshes.
The wicked queen The wicked queen in "The Wild Swans" marries a king and then turns her 11 stepsons into swans.
The wood pigeons The wood pigeons in "The Snow Queen" help guide Gerda on her way to find Kay.
The young king The young king in "The Wild Swans" falls in love with Elisa and takes her to be his queen.
The young wife The young wife in "The Old House" finds the tin soldier in the ground after she and the grown boy move into a new house.
The youngest child in "The Child in the Grave" The youngest child in "The Child in the Grave" shows his mother her grief is excessive and promises they will be together again soon.
The youngest child in "The Fir Tree" The youngest child in "The Fir Tree" takes the tinsel star from the fir tree before it is burned.
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