Fathers and Sons | Study Guide

Ivan Turgenev

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Course Hero. "Fathers and Sons Study Guide." Course Hero. 6 Feb. 2018. Web. 19 June 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fathers-and-Sons/>.

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Course Hero. (2018, February 6). Fathers and Sons Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved June 19, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fathers-and-Sons/

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Course Hero. "Fathers and Sons Study Guide." February 6, 2018. Accessed June 19, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fathers-and-Sons/.

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Course Hero, "Fathers and Sons Study Guide," February 6, 2018, accessed June 19, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Fathers-and-Sons/.

Fathers and Sons | Chapter 9 | Summary

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Summary

Bazarov walks through the garden commenting on the trees Arkady's father has planted. He nudges Arkady and comments on Nikolai's "good taste" when he sees Fenitchka relaxing under a tree with Mitya. Bazarov approaches them and flirts with Fenitchka under the ruse of offering medical advice. Fenitchka doesn't seem bothered, whereas the maid, Dunyasha, blushes and giggles like a schoolgirl. Soon after flirting with Fenitchka Bazarov annoys Arkady by calling Mitya an "extra heir" and cruelly teases him about his moral desire for Nikolai and Fenitchka to marry. When Bazarov hears Nikolai playing the cello in the distance, he laughs out loud at the ridiculousness of a middle-aged man in the country playing an instrument.

Analysis

Bazarov behaves badly once again, as a know-it-all about the trees Nikolai has planted, and his deliberately cruel comments about Arkady's family strike Arkady as deeply offensive. Although Arkady was able to forgive Bazarov's views of Pavel because Pavel represents the gentry Bazarov so deeply despises, his attacks against Nikolai's music, Arkady's love of nature, and the presence of innocent baby Mitya feel personal and unwarranted. Their relationship begins to change as Arkady continues to distance himself from the harsher of Bazarov's views and what seem unnecessarily spiteful.

Bazarov shows another side of his character when interacting with Fenitchka and Mitya. He flirts easily with Fenitchka and Dunyasha and has more luck playing with baby Mitya than Arkady does. As he easily gained rapport with the servant boys while looking for frogs, Bazarov shows himself at ease with people, suggesting despite his cold exterior, Bazarov has the ability to connect with others, should he desire, and he can behave graciously. As he assures Arkady, "I know how to behave myself." His desire to exhibit friendly behavior, however, likely runs toward connecting with servants as he demonstrates little but disdain for the gentry.

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