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For Whom the Bell Tolls

Ernest Hemingway

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Course Hero. "For Whom the Bell Tolls Study Guide." Course Hero. 29 Sep. 2016. Web. 23 Jan. 2017. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/For-Whom-the-Bell-Tolls/>.

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Course Hero. (2016, September 29). For Whom the Bell Tolls Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved January 23, 2017, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/For-Whom-the-Bell-Tolls/

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Course Hero. "For Whom the Bell Tolls Study Guide." September 29, 2016. Accessed January 23, 2017. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/For-Whom-the-Bell-Tolls/.

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Course Hero, "For Whom the Bell Tolls Study Guide," September 29, 2016, accessed January 23, 2017, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/For-Whom-the-Bell-Tolls/.

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Summary

Study Guide for Ernest Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls including chapter summary, character analysis, and more. Learn all about For Whom the Bell Tolls, ask questions, and get the answers you need.

Overview

Book Basics

Author: Ernest Hemingway

Year Published: 1940

Type: Novel

Genre: War Literature

Perspective and Narrator:

For Whom the Bell Tolls is told from the third-person point of view by an omniscient narrator.

Tense:

For Whom the Bell Tolls is told primarily in the past tense.

About the Title:

The title, For Whom the Bell Tolls, comes from a text called Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions by John Donne, a 17th-century English poet and Anglican priest. The 17th of Donne's meditations begins with the words "No man is an island, entire of itself," and ends with the line "Therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee." Donne refers to funeral bells: since everyone meets the end of life at some point, the bells toll for everyone as a metaphor for death. Ernest Hemingway sided with the fight against fascism, as most Americans did. He chose the excerpt to express his support for the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War and to emphasize the theme of sacrifice for a cause that is greater than any one individual.

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