Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis | Study Guide

Joan W. Scott

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis Study Guide." Course Hero. 8 Jan. 2021. Web. 19 Jan. 2022. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Gender-A-Useful-Category-of-Historical-Analysis/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2021, January 8). Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved January 19, 2022, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Gender-A-Useful-Category-of-Historical-Analysis/

In text

(Course Hero, 2021)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis Study Guide." January 8, 2021. Accessed January 19, 2022. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Gender-A-Useful-Category-of-Historical-Analysis/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis Study Guide," January 8, 2021, accessed January 19, 2022, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Gender-A-Useful-Category-of-Historical-Analysis/.

Joan W. Scott | Biography

Share
Share

Early Life

Joan W. Scott was born Joan Wallach on December 18, 1941, in Brooklyn, New York, to parents who were high school history teachers. Her father lost his job in 1951 because he would not go along with a committee that was investigating suspected communism in education. This event influenced Scott's stance on freedom of speech.

Education and Academic Career

Scott graduated with honors from Brandeis University in 1962. She continued her education at the University of Wisconsin at Madison where she earned a master's degree (1964) and a doctorate (1969). Scott spent two years teaching at the University of Illinois at Chicago (1970–72) and then taught for two years at Northwestern University (1972–74). Her doctoral dissertation which connected changes in technology with changes in the political views of the working class in 19th-century France was published in 1974 and cemented her scholarly reputation. Scott then went on to teach at the University of North Carolina (1974–80) and then became a distinguished professor at Brown University (1980–85). She was also a founding director of the Pembrooke Center for Teaching and Research on Women at Brown.

Scott became the second woman to join Princeton University's Institute for Advanced Study in 1985. Her book Gender and the Politics of History (1998) included "Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis," an essay that is still being discussed in academic circles today. In 2000 she was named Harold F. Linder Professor of Social Science at Princeton University. Among Scott's many awards and honors, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2008. She also received the Award for Scholarly Distinction from the American Historical Association in 2009.

Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!