Literature Study GuidesHazelwood V Kuhlmeier

Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier | Study Guide

U.S. Supreme Court

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Course Hero. "Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier Study Guide." Course Hero. 24 Jan. 2020. Web. 20 Feb. 2020. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Hazelwood-v-Kuhlmeier/>.

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Course Hero. (2020, January 24). Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved February 20, 2020, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Hazelwood-v-Kuhlmeier/

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Course Hero. "Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier Study Guide." January 24, 2020. Accessed February 20, 2020. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Hazelwood-v-Kuhlmeier/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier Study Guide," January 24, 2020, accessed February 20, 2020, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Hazelwood-v-Kuhlmeier/.

Overview

Author

U.S. Supreme Court

Year Decided

1988

Type

Primary Source

Genre

U.S. Supreme Court Case

At a Glance

  • On January 13, 1988, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, a case involving the free speech rights of high school students.
  • In a 5–3 vote the court ruled that a high school principal had the right to prevent publication of articles he found objectionable in a school-sponsored newspaper, based on the school's academic standards.
  • Students who worked on the paper claimed that the principal's action violated their First Amendment rights.
  • Writing for the majority, Justice Byron R. White (1917–2002) said that school officials can block student speech in a school-sponsored publication if they determine the speech violates the school's educational mission.
  • In a sharp dissent, Justice William J. Brennan Jr. (1906–97) wrote that the principal's action violated the students' First Amendment rights by censoring student speech. The majority, he said, abandoned the precedent set earlier by the court in Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969).
  • The Student Press Law Center argued that school censorship increased after Hazelwood.
  • In 2005, a federal appeals court extended the Hazelwood decision to school-sponsored publications at public colleges and universities.

Summary

This study guide for U.S. Supreme Court's Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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