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King Lear | Character Analysis

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King Lear

Lear's world falls apart because he trusts himself too much; he thinks he can manipulate events, tell who loves him, and stay king even after setting his throne aside. He is proud and full of power at the start of the play, but he crumbles into doubt and, eventually, madness. The entire play follows Lear down from the throne and into exile; from there, he weathers a storm, despair, and madness. Lear dies at the end of the play.

Edmund

Edmund schemes, first to displace his brother, Edgar, and then to betray his father. He lies and manipulates. He has affairs with both Regan and Goneril. When he is charged with treason in Act 5, he fights an anonymous challenger who is seeking to prove Edmund's guilt through trial by combat. This unknown knight turns out to be his brother, Edgar, who kills Edmund.

Edgar

Edgar starts the play quite naïve, and he is quickly taken in by his brother's schemes. Once he's banished, he disguises himself as Poor Tom, a crazy beggar, to stay in the kingdom. He cares for his father, showing his loyalty. Edgar guides his father through a suicide attempt, lying to him as Gloucester leaps from what he thinks are the cliffs of Dover. Edgar rises in stature throughout the play, killing the treacherous Goneril's servant Oswald and his own traitorous brother, Edmund. In the play's final lines, Edgar is made joint ruler of the kingdom.

Earl of Gloucester

Gloucester is an older nobleman within Lear's kingdom. He is quite loyal to Lear and at times stands in for him. Gloucester has two sons: Edgar, his older and legitimate son, and Edmund, who is illegitimate. Gloucester is deceived by Edmund's betrayal of Edgar, and he banishes his elder son. Gloucester remains loyal to Lear throughout, and the Duke of Cornwall punishes him for this loyalty by gouging his eyes out. Gloucester wants to kill himself due to his despair, and he asks someone he thinks is a poor beggar to guide him to the cliffs of Dover. Gloucester dies at the end of the play.

Cordelia

When Lear divides his kingdom in Act 1, Scene 1, Cordelia refuses to play her assigned role and declare how much she loves her father. As a result, he strips her of her dowry. Only the King of France is willing to marry her without a dowry, a fact that shapes her fate and Britain's. She is absent through most of the first three acts, then returns to Britain late in the play, bringing French forces with her. In the final battle, the rebel forces capture her. Edmund arranges for her to be put to death, and she's hanged in Act 5. Because of her steadfast loyalty to her father, she is a saintly figure throughout King Lear.

Goneril

Goneril is a true villain. She shows this by lying to her father about how much she loves him and by acting to erode Lear's authority and position. She's married to the Duke of Albany, but as she rebels against her father and seeks power, her relationship with her husband deteriorates until the two of them actively loathe one another. She begins an affair with Edmund. When he's killed, she poisons her sister Regan and stabs herself.

Regan

Like Goneril, Regan is a true villain. At the beginning of the play, she makes public declarations of intense love for her father, but she follows this by finding ways to undermine his authority. She and Goneril turn their father out to wander in a storm. Regan suggests that her husband, the Duke of Cornwall, blind Gloucester for his treachery. When a servant tries to prevent this, she picks up a sword and kills him. Like Goneril, she begins an affair with Edmund and dies after he's killed, when Goneril poisons her.

Questions for Characters

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It was at the theater and at Carnegie Hall that Paul really lived; the rest was but a sleep and a forgetting. This was Paul's fairy tale, and it had for him all the allurement of a secret love.... It
Discuss some characteristics of romantic literature and painting. Discuss some characteristics of romantic literature and painting.
just simply answer this questions below this quote author name is Edmund Bruke. i dont need any cover page, or citing source page, just answer this question regarding this quote. thank you Quote “Thos

Flashcards for Characters

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Term:

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.

Definition:

Hamlet Act 1, Scene 1 Spoken by Marcellus (and not Hamlet as is commonly believed). CONTEXT Horatio spots the Ghost of Hamlet's father approaching. Hamlet calls out to the Ghost and it beckons Hamlet to leave with it. Despite the pleadings of Horatio and Marcellus, who are afraid that the apparition might be an evil entity in disguise, Hamlet agrees to follow the Ghost and the two figures disappear into the dark. Marcellus, shaken by the many recent disturbing events and no doubt angered (as is Hamlet) by Claudius's mismanagement of the body politic, astutely notes that Denmark is festering with moral and political corruption. Horatio replies "Heaven will direct it" (91), meaning heaven will guide the state of Denmark to health and stability. MEANING - Claudius has usurped throne (politics are rotten) - Christian providential fate is corrupted (fickle fate, not all-seeing God in charge) - Rotten could mean, literally, a dead body

Term:

Oh, that this too, too sullied flesh would melt, Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew, Or that the Everlasting had not fixed His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God, God! How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable Seem to me all the uses of this world! Fie on ’t, ah fie! 'Tis an unweeded garden That grows to seed. Things rank and gross in nature Possess it merely. That it should come to this. But two months dead—nay, not so much, not two. So excellent a king, that was to this Hyperion to a satyr. So loving to my mother That he might not beteem the winds of heaven Visit her face too roughly.—Heaven and earth, Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him As if increase of appetite had grown By what it fed on, and yet, within a month— Let me not think on ’t. Frailty, thy name is woman!— A little month, or ere those shoes were old With which she followed my poor father’s body, Like Niobe, all tears. Why she, even she— O God, a beast that wants discourse of reason Would have mourned longer!—married with my uncle, My father’s brother, but no more like my father Than I to Hercules. Within a month, Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears Had left the flushing in her gallèd eyes, She married. O most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets! It is not nor it cannot come to good, But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue.

Definition:

Hamlet Act 1, Scene 2 Spoken by Hamlet CONTEXT Hamlet is bemoaning his mother's connection his uncle Claudius and saying that Claudius is unworthy of her, for he is no more like his father than Hamlet is to Hercules. MEANING - - -

Term:

Historica Danica

Definition:

- Written by Saxo Grammaticus in the 12th C. - A "history" of Denmark - Idea of history-keeping as accurate did not come into effect until 19th C - Shakespeare definitely used it as a source for Hamlet - Difference 1: Feng (Claudius) is known to have killed the King - Difference 2: There is no ghost, and Amleth's (Hamlet's) madness is confirmed as an antic disposition - Difference 3: Amleth is a buffoon (i.e. riding horse backwards) - The Players are not in Saxo Grammaticus, thus disallowing the meta-theatre commentary in Shakespeare's play

Term:

Revenge Tragedy

Definition:

- Two models: 1. classical (3 act structure, atrocity; revenger created; further atrocity put in place by revenger) 2. Christian (God should enact judgement, not man) Hamlet walks the line between these two

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