Literature Study GuidesLife In The Iron Mills

Life in the Iron Mills | Study Guide

Rebecca Harding Davis

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Life in the Iron Mills Study Guide." Course Hero. 15 Mar. 2019. Web. 20 Apr. 2019. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Life-in-the-Iron-Mills/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2019, March 15). Life in the Iron Mills Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved April 20, 2019, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Life-in-the-Iron-Mills/

In text

(Course Hero, 2019)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Life in the Iron Mills Study Guide." March 15, 2019. Accessed April 20, 2019. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Life-in-the-Iron-Mills/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Life in the Iron Mills Study Guide," March 15, 2019, accessed April 20, 2019, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Life-in-the-Iron-Mills/.

Overview

Author

Rebecca Harding Davis

Year Published

1861

Type

Short Story

Genre

Fiction

Perspective and Narrator

An unnamed narrator tells the outer story, or narrative frame, in the first person, while relating the primary story of Hugh and Deborah mainly in the third person.

Tense

"Life in the Iron Mills" is narrated in the past tense except for a narrative frame, which opens and closes the body of the story and is told in the present tense. The unknown narrator is presumed to be someone (possibly divine) present during the action of the story.

About the Title

Taken at face value, the title is a simple descriptor of how immigrants to the Appalachia region lived in an industrial town in West Virginia in the 19th century. The title holds a certain verbal irony, as Davis illustrates in the story that the "puddlers" who heat and stir iron in the iron mills are living such meager existences that they can barely be deemed living at all. The subtitle, "or The Korl Woman," relates to the female figure sculpted by one of the workers, which represents the human yearning for worth.

Summary

This study guide for Rebecca Harding Davis's Life in the Iron Mills offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

Buy this book from Amazon.com
Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about Life in the Iron Mills? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!