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Lysistrata | Infographic

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Check out this Infographic to learn more about Aristophanes's Lysistrata. Study visually with character maps, plot summaries, helpful context, and more.

lysistrata-aristophanes_TESTLysistrataDriven, insightful, and charismatic Athenian leaderMagistrateBlustering, war-mongering authority figureLampitoLysistratas steadfast Spartan counterpartMyrrhineCoy, loyal woman; tortures Cinesias by denying him sexCinesiasChauvinistic, desperate husband to MyrrhineChorus of Old WomenVoice of femininity and social cohesion Chorus of Old MenVoice of masculinity and traditionSymbolsStaffsSymbolize male desires and the increasing tension of the playBowls & WineRepresent femininity and female desireThe AcropolisStands for the functions of Greek society, including trade and commerce Lysistrataby the NumbersPlays written by Aristophanes, of which 11 survive in their entirety ~40Years Athens and Sparta engaged in the Peloponnesian War 27Year blockaded, starving Athens surrendered, ending the Peloponnesian War404 BCELetters in the longest word in literature, the name of a dish, from Aristophaness play Assemblywomen183Lysistrata, Lines 616–618f youd like to hear us give some good advice, / then start to listen, keep your mouths quite shut, / the way we did. We’ll save you from yourselves.Aristophanes, a great comedic and satirical writer of ancient Greece, wrote witty plays that still resonate with audiences today. As in Lysistrata, considered by some to be his best play, Aristophaness works often criticized the statesmen who drove Athens into the Peloponnesian War with Sparta.ARISTOPHANESC. 450 BCE–C. 388 BCEAuthorThemesDeterminationTo achieve peace, Lysistrata must fend off male advances and wavering resolve within her own ranks. Femininity vs. MasculinityThe men of Athens and Sparta battle with weapons, while the women wage their own battle using their sensuality. Civil DisobedienceBy uniting and making themselves heard, the women of Greece make war too costly for either side. 92422AAthens and Sparta are embattled in the Peloponnesian War, with no end in sight—but one woman has a plan. If Lysistrata can band every woman in Greece together and coax them to resist the desires of men, it might be enough to stop the war. The mens need for sex spurs them to make a plan for peace in this satirical, farcical play.Alls FairMAIN CHARACTERS Aristophanes411 BCE Ancient GreekPlayAuthorFirst PerformedOriginal LanguageLysistrataSatireSources: Cornell College, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Foreword to Lysistrata by Jack Lindsay, The Huffington Post Copyright © 2016 Course Hero, Inc.

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