Literature Study GuidesMcDonald V Chicago

McDonald v. Chicago | Study Guide

United States Supreme Court

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "McDonald v. Chicago Study Guide." Course Hero. 4 Oct. 2019. Web. 18 Oct. 2019. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/McDonald-v-Chicago/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2019, October 4). McDonald v. Chicago Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved October 18, 2019, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/McDonald-v-Chicago/

In text

(Course Hero, 2019)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "McDonald v. Chicago Study Guide." October 4, 2019. Accessed October 18, 2019. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/McDonald-v-Chicago/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "McDonald v. Chicago Study Guide," October 4, 2019, accessed October 18, 2019, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/McDonald-v-Chicago/.

Overview

Author

United States Supreme Court

Year Decided

2010

Type

Primary Source

Genre

Law, U.S. Supreme Court Case

At a Glance

  • McDonald v. Chicago (2010) centers on whether states and cities can restrict the right of individuals to own guns.
  • It follows up on a similar case, District of Columbia v. Heller (2008).
  • Heller considered a handgun ban in Washington, DC, a federal jurisdiction. The Heller ruling did not address whether the individual right to own guns could be applied to states and local municipalities.
  • McDonald v. Chicago aimed to build upon Heller, extending the application of the 2nd Amendment to the state and local levels.
  • McDonald challenged Chicago's restrictions on handgun ownership, arguing that the 2nd Amendment guarantees an individual's right to own a gun for self-defense in a high-crime neighborhood.
  • The Supreme Court ruled 5–4 that an individual's right to keep and bear arms was fundamental and therefore incorporated—or applied to state and local governments—through the due process clause of the 14th Amendment, which protects citizens' fundamental rights at the state level.
  • McDonald v. Chicago was the first case in which the Supreme Court used the doctrine of selective incorporation to apply the 2nd Amendment to state and local governments.

Summary

This study guide for United States Supreme Court's McDonald v. Chicago offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

Buy this book from Amazon.com
Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about McDonald v. Chicago? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes