Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Mythology Study Guide." Course Hero. 14 Feb. 2017. Web. 23 Oct. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Mythology/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2017, February 14). Mythology Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved October 23, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Mythology/

In text

(Course Hero, 2017)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Mythology Study Guide." February 14, 2017. Accessed October 23, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Mythology/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Mythology Study Guide," February 14, 2017, accessed October 23, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Mythology/.

Mythology | Characters

Share
Share
Character Description
Zeus/Jupiter Zeus/Jupiter is the king of the gods in Greek mythology; he is also god of thunder and lightning, wielding his thunderbolt as a weapon in times of crisis. Read More
Hera/Juno Hera/Juno is the Greek goddess of marriage, but in practice she spends much of her time avenging herself on the women Zeus seduces. Read More
Hermes/Mercury Hermes/Mercury is the Greek messenger of the gods, but he is also the protector of travelers and thieves as well as the God of commerce. Read More
Athena/Minerva Athena/Minerva is the Greek goddess of the city of Athens, a protector of civilization, and also associated with weaving and handicrafts. Read More
Apollo Apollo is the Greek god of light and truth, but he is also associated with healing, archery, and music. Read More
Poseidon/Neptune Poseidon/Neptune is the Greek god of the sea, which makes him important to the seafaring Greeks; he is also associated with horses and earthquakes. Read More
Aphrodite/Venus Aphrodite/Venus is the Greek goddess of love and beauty, which makes her an important figure in many myths; she is sometimes kind and joyous but can also create destruction. Read More
Achelous Achelous is a river god Hercules fights for Deianira's hand in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Achilles Achilles is the great Greek hero of the Trojan War, known for being invincible in battle but with a weak point in his heel in Part 4, Chapters 1 and 2.
Acis Acis marries Galatea and is killed by the Cyclops Polyphemus who loves Galatea as well in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Acrisius Acrisius is a king of Argos who fears his daughter will have a son who will kill him, so he sets her and her child adrift at sea in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Actaeon Actaeon is a hunter turned into a deer and killed by his dogs after he accidentally sees Artemis bathing in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Admetus Hercules convinces Death to give back Admetus's wife after Hercules gets drunk while Admetus is in mourning in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Adonis Adonis is a lover of Aphrodite who is killed by a wild boar; flowers bloom where his blood hits the ground in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Adrastus Adrastus is the only surviving chieftain who allies with Polyneices against Thebes. He appeals to Theseus for assistance in burying his fallen comrades in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Aeacus Aeacus is Zeus's son with Aegina who begs his father to reinhabit his lonely island, so Zeus turns the ants on the island into men in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Aeacus Aeacus is one of the three kings who judge the dead when they arrive in Hades in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Aegeus Aegeus is a king of Athens who fathers Theseus and kills himself when he thinks his son is dead in Part 3, Chapter 2. The sea he leaps into, the Aegean, is named after him.
Aegina Aegina is the namesake of an island where Hera turns the men into ants in retaliation for Aegina's affair with Zeus in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Aegisthus Aegisthius is the lover of Agamemnon's wife, Clytemnestra. He kills Agamemnon when Agamemnon returns from the Trojan War in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Aegyptus Aegyptus is a descendant of Io who dwells near the Nile; his sons want to marry the Danaïds who murder them instead of succumbing to marriage in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Aeneas Aeneas is a hero for the Trojans in the Trojan War in Part 4, Chapters 1 and 2; after the war, he travels to Italy and founds Rome in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Aeolus Aeolus is the king of the winds, often appearing in myths to offer assistance to sailors or others in need.
Aepytus Aepytus is Merope's son who helps her avenge his father's death and defeat Polyphontes in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Aesculapius Aesculapius becomes one of the greatest physicians in Greece, able to cure any ailment or injury in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Æetes Æetes is the king of Colchis who takes in Phrixus and becomes the owner of the Golden Fleece in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Aethra Aethra is Theseus's mother who advises him to help the nations against Thebes bury their dead when Creon forbids it in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Agamemnon Agamemnon, Menelaus's brother, serves as commander of the Greek troops in the Trojan War and distinguishes himself as a hero during the fighting in Part 4, Chapters 1 and 2. When he returns home, his wife kills him in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Agave Agave is a daughter of King Cadmus of Thebes. Dionysus drives her into a madness, which causes her to mistake her son for a lion and kill him in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Ajax Ajax is a hero of the Trojan war who kills himself after going on a mad rampage and killing the army's cattle in Part 4, Chapter 2.
Alcestis Alcestis is the wife of Hercules's friend King Admetus. She sacrifices herself for her husband, and Hercules wrestles Death to bring her back to life in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Alcinoüs Alcinoüs is a king who helps Odysseus in the last leg of his journey to Ithaca in Part 4, Chapter 3.
Alcmena Alcmena is seduced by Zeus in the form of her own husband, Amphitryon, and gives birth to Hercules in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Alcyone Alcyone is so distraught when she learns her husband, Ceyx, has been killed at sea, she runs into the sea and the gods turn her into a bird in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Alecto Alecto is a fury sent to prevent Aeneas from marrying the Latin princess Lavinia in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Alpheus Alpheus is a river god who follows his beloved after Artemis turns her into a spring in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Althea Althea is the queen of Calydon who destroys Meleager's thread of life when she learns he gave credit for the hunt to a woman in Part 3, Chapter 4.
Amalthea Amalthea possesses the "horn of plenty" or "Cornucopia" that always provides food and drink in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Amata Amata is the queen of Latium who opposes her daughter marrying Aeneas in Part 4, Chapter 4.
The Amazons The Amazons are a race of warrior women who live apart from men but sometimes become involved with heroes.
Amphitryon Amphitryon is a military general whose wife is seduced by Zeus while he is away at war; it is unclear whether or not he knows Hercules is his son in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Amymone Amymone is a Danaïd that Poseidon rescues from a satyr in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Anchises Anchises is Aeneas's father who advises Aeneas about the best way to establish his settlement in Italy in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Andromache Andromache is married to Hector of Troy in Part 4, Chapter 1, and she is taken into slavery in Part 4, Chapter 2; in Part 4, Chapter 4, she is revealed to have escaped slavery and lives happily with a new husband on an island where she greets Aeneas in his journey.
Andromeda Andromeda is a princess in Ethiopia, set for sacrifice to a sea monster when Perseus rescues, then marries, her in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Anteia Anteia is King Proteus's wife who falls in love with Bellerophon and takes revenge when Bellerophon refuses her in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Antigone Creon executes Oedipus's daughter Antigone after she defies his orders and buries her brother Polyneices after he leads a rebellion in Thebes in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Antiope Antiope is a Theban princess who bears two sons after an affair with Zeus in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Antiope/Hippolyta Antiope, also called Hippolyta, is an Amazon queen who bears Theseus his only son, Hippolytus, in Part 3, Chapter 2; Hercules accidentally kills her in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Arachne Arachne is changed into a spider after tying in a weaving contest with Athena in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Arcas Arcas is the son of Zeus and Callisto who becomes the constellation the Lesser Bear in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Ares Ares, the Greek god of war, inspires men to fight and find glory in battle, but he is also a bit of a coward when threatened and a crybaby when injured.
Arethusa Artemis turns Arethusa, one of her mortal followers, into a spring to help her evade the attentions of the river god Alpheus in Part 2, Chapter 2.
The Argonauts The Argonauts accompany Jason in the Quest of the Golden Fleece in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Argos Argos is Odysseus's dog in Part 4, Chapter 3, who recognizes his master after 20 years, even though Odysseus is in disguise.
Argus Argus is a giant with 100 eyes whom Hera assigns to keep watch over Io (in cow form) in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Ariadne Ariadne is the daughter of Minos of Crete who loves Theseus and helps him escape from the Labyrinth in Part 3, Chapter 2.
Arion Arion is a musician whom dolphins help escape from sailors bent on robbing and killing him in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Aristaeus Aristaeus is a beekeeper who engages in sacrifice to restore his hive after it dies in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Artemis/Diana Artemis/Diana is the Greek goddess of the hunt and protector of youth and virginity. She is associated with the moon, as her twin Apollo is associated with the sun; known in the Roman world as Diana.
Ascanius Ascanius is the son of Aeneas. He kills a farmer's pet stag shortly after they arrive in Italy, which spurs the Latins to wage war against Aeneas and the Trojans in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Asopus Asopus is the father of Aegina whose search for his daughter (after Zeus takes her) results in Sisyphus's punishment in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Apsyrtus Apsyrtus is Medea's brother, whom she kills as he attempts to pursue Medea, Jason, and the Argonauts as they return to Greece with the Golden Fleece in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Astyanax Hector's young son Astyanax is thrown from the walls of Troy when the Greeks raze the city in Part 4, Chapter 2.
Atalanta Atalanta is a huntress and heroine who gains fame for her part in the Calydonian boar hunt, and resists marriage for most of her life in Part 3, Chapter 4.
Athamas Athamas is a king whose children are threatened by his second wife in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Atlas Atlas is a Titan who bears the world on his shoulders.
Atreus Atreus is the father of Agamemnon and Menelaus, commanders of troops in the Trojan War. He is the patriarch of a house that lives under a curse until Agamemnon's son lifts the curse with his own sacrifice in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Atropos Atropos is the Fate that cuts the thread of life when a person dies in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Aurora Aurora is the Greek goddess of the dawn.
Autonoe Autonoe is a daughter of King Cadmus of Thebes. She suffers after her son Actaeon is killed by his own hunting dogs in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Balder Balder is a Norse god known for his invincibility and likeability, but he is killed by one of Loki's tricks in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Baucis Baucis is an old woman of Phrygia who, with her husband, Philemon, welcomes Jupiter and Mercury (disguised as travelers) into her home and is rewarded in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Bellerophon Bellerophon is the youth who captures the winged horse, Pegasus, and becomes a hero in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Biton Biton is one of the sons of Hera's priestess Cydippe who dies after taking their mother on a pilgrimage in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Boreas Boreas is the personification of the North Wind.
Briseis Agamemnon takes the maiden Briseis from Achilles after Achilles has Chryseis taken from Agamemnon; the conflict leads Achilles to abandon the battle and stay in his tent in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Brynhild Brynhild is a Valkyrie, a female servant of the Norse god Odin who escorts heroes to their afterlife. She has a short but unhappy affair with the Norse hero Sigurd in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Cadmus Cadmus is the founder and first king of the Greek city of Thebes. He has a happy marriage and prosperous reign, but his children are tormented by suffering in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Calais Calais is the son of Boreas and Orithyia, and the brother of Zetes in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Calliope Calliope is the Muse of epic poetry in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Callisto Callisto bears a son with Zeus, and jealous Hera turns her into a bear, which becomes the constellation the Great Bear in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Calypso Calypso is a sea nymph who falls in love with Odysseus and wants to keep him on her island in Part 4, Chapter 3.
Cassandra Cassandra is Priam's daughter, given the gift of prophecy but cursed with never being believed in Part 4, Chapters 2 and 3.
Cassiopeia Cassiopeia is an Ethiopian queen who endangers her daughter Andromeda's life when she boasts about her own beauty compared to the gods in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Castor Castor, along with his twin brother, Pollux, is a brother of Helen of Troy. He is known for his skill with horses, and with his brother serves as one of the Argonauts in Jason's Quest of the Golden Fleece in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Cecrops Cecrops is the first king of Attica, the land surrounding Athens, and is said to be half dragon in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Celeus Celeus is the son of Metaneira, the woman who takes in the grieving goddess Demeter.
Centaurs Centaurs are half-man, half-horse creatures known for their violent and wild natures in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Cephalus Cephalus is the husband of Procris. He is taken by Aurora and refuses to be unfaithful to his wife, but his suspicions almost destroy his marriage in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Cerberus Cerberus is the three-headed dog that guards the entrance to Hades ferociously, but easily bribed with cake.
Ceyx Ceyx is a sailor who leaves his wife for a sea voyage and dies in a shipwreck in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Charon Charon is the ferryman who takes dead souls across the rivers surrounding the underworld.
Charybdis Charybdis is a sea monster described as a giant whirlpool that torments sailors, including Jason, Odysseus, and Aeneas.
Chiron Chiron is a Centaur known for his wisdom and kindness; he becomes a teacher to heroes in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Chryseis Chryseis is Agamemnon's companion during the Trojan War, taken from her father, one of Apollo's priests, in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Circe Circe changes Odysseus's men into pigs, but once she meets Odysseus and falls in love with him, she becomes a valuable ally in Part 4, Chapter 3.
Cleobis Cleobis is one of the sons of Hera's priestess Cydippe who dies after taking their mother on a pilgrimage in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Clio Clio is the Muse of history in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Clotho Clotho is the Fate who spins the thread of life for each human.
Clymene Clymene is the mortal mother of Phaëthon in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Clytemnestra Clytemnestra kills her husband, Agamemnon, after he returns from the Trojan War and is killed by her son Orestes as retribution in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Clytie Clytie turns into a sunflower when her love for the Sun god causes her to track him across the sky for days on end in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Coronis Coronis is a woman who bears Apollo's child Aesculapius, but is killed by the god because she prefers a mortal in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Creon Creon is Oedipus's uncle who eventually sends Oedipus into exile and later refuses to allow the burial of soldiers who march against Thebes in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Cresphontes Cresphontes is Hercules's son who is killed in a rebellion in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Cretheus Cretheus is the husband of Tyro in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Creüsa Creüsa bears Apollo's son in secret, then abandons the child, but she is haunted by what became of the baby in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Cronus Cronus is the king of the Titans who eats his children to prevent them from overthrowing him, which his son Zeus finally does in Part 1, Chapter 3.
Cydippe Cydippe is a devoted priestess of Hera who makes a long pilgrimage to see an image of the goddess in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Daedalus Daedalus constructs the Labyrinth that houses the Minotaur in Crete, and he alone knows how to escape the Labyrinth in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Danaë Danaë is the daughter of the king of Argos who is seduced by Zeus and gives birth to the hero Perseus in Part 3, Chapter 1.
The Danaïds The Danaïds are 50 daughters of Danaüs who refuse to marry, and murder their bridegrooms. They are punished in the afterlife by eternally carrying water in leaky jars in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Danaüs Danaüs is a descendant of Io who dwells near the Nile. His daughters are the Danaïds, cursed in the underworld for resisting marriage in life in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Daphne Daphne is a wood nymph whose father turns her into a tree to honor her desire never to marry in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Deianira Deianira is Hercules's second wife who poisons Hercules, then kills herself when she thinks he has taken a mistress in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Demeter/Ceres Demeter/Ceres is the Greek goddess of grain and the harvest, and her mourning for her daughter Persephone leads to the cycle of seasons each year in Part 1, Chapter 2.
Deucalion Deucalion is Prometheus's son who, with Pyrrha, reestablishes the human race after Zeus destroys the world in a flood in Part 1, Chapter 3.
Dictys Dictys is a fisherman who takes in Perseus and his mother, Danaë, when they wash ashore in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Dido Dido is a queen of Carthage who offers Aeneas assistance and love during his journey to Italy, but she kills herself when he leaves in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Diomedes Diomedes is a Greek soldier who injures Ares during the Trojan War in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Dionysus/Bacchus Dionysus/Bacchus is the Greek god of wine, associated with festivity as well as madness.
Dryope Dryope accidentally picks lotus blossoms from a tree that is the nymph Lotis and is turned into a tree herself in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Echo Echo is a wood nymph cursed to only repeat what she hears in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Electra Electra is a daughter of Agamemnon who helps her brother, Orestes, avenge their father's death by killing their mother, Clytemnestra, in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Electryon Electryon is the son of Perseus and Andromeda who becomes Hercules's grandfather in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Endymion Endymion is a shepherd who attracts the love of the moon goddess Selene, who places him in a state of eternal sleep in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Epaphus Epaphus is the son of Zeus and Io, born after she comes to the Nile valley and is transformed back to human form after Zeus hides her in the guise of a cow in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Ephialtes Ephialtes is one of two Giant sons of Poseidon who challenge the gods in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Epimenides Epimenides is a shepherd who sleeps for 57 years in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Epimetheus Epimetheus is the Titan who creates the animals, giving them so many gifts that he must seek help from his brother Prometheus when he creates man in Part 1, Chapter 3.
Erato Erato is the Muse of love-poetry in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Ericthonius Ericthonius is a half-man, half-serpent king of Athens in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Erinyes/Furies The Erinyes or Furies are lesser goddesses tasked with punishing wrongdoing both in Hades and on earth; they are cruel but fair.
Eris Eris is the goddess of discord, generally disliked; her actions at a banquet indirectly lead to the Trojan War in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Eros/Cupid Eros/Cupid is Aphrodite's son and the Greek god of love whose arrows can inspire people to fall in love or out of love.
Erysichthon Erysichthon offends Ceres and is afflicted with Famine, losing his fortune and his life trying to sate his hunger in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Eteocles Eteocles is Oedipus's younger son who starts a war when he takes the throne of Thebes from his older brother in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Eumaeus Eumaeus is a swineherd who helps conceal Odysseus when he first returns to Ithaca in Part 4, Chapter 3.
Europa Zeus seduces the princess Europa while he is disguised as a bull in Chapter 1, Part 4.
Eurus Eurus is the Greek personification of the East Wind.
Euryalus Euryalus is a young soldier in Aeneas's army who takes on a dangerous and ultimately doomed mission to warn Aeneas about the enemy troops' activities in Italy in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Eurycleia Eurycleia is Odysseus's nurse who recognizes the scar on his foot when he returns home in disguise in Part 4, Chapter 3.
Eurydice Eurydice is Orpheus's wife who dies and is almost brought back to earth in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Eurystheus Eurystheus is the king of Mycenae who assigns Hercules his 12 labors as a means of purifying Hercules after he kills his own family in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Eurytus Hercules kills King Eurytus's son by accident but Zeus punishes him for it in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Euterpe Euterpe is the Muse of lyric-poetry in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Evander Evander is a poor king of a land on the site where Rome will be founded; he helps Aeneas enlist the Etruscans in his fight against the Latins and Rutulians in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Freya Freya is the Norse goddess of love and beauty in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Freyr Freyr is the Norse goddess of the fruits of the earth in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Frigga Frigga is the wife of Odin, known for her wisdom in Norse mythology in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Gaea Gaea is the Greek name for the earth, mother of the Titans and assorted monsters, and giver of life to all in Part 1, Chapter 3.
Galatea 1 Galatea is a nymph whom the Cyclops Polyphemus loves, but she does not love him back and marries another man in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Galatea 2 Galatea is the name Pygmalion gives to the statue he loves when she becomes a real woman in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Geryon Geryon is a three-bodied creature Hercules kills in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Glaucus 1 Glaucus incurs the gods' wrath for feeding his horses human flesh in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Glaucus 2 Glaucus is a fisherman turned sea-god who falls in love with Scylla, which prompts Circe to turn Scylla into a monster in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Gorgons The Gorgons are three female monsters with bodies like dragons, and snakes in place of hair who appear in Part 3, Chapter 1; a look from one of them can turn a man to stone.
Gray Women The Gray Women are three sisters whose individual names are not given. Their bodies resemble those of birds, but they have arms and share a single eye that they pass among themselves in order to see in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Griemhild Griemhild is the mother of the Norse hero Gunnar who tricks the hero Sigurd into leaving Brynhild and marrying Griemhild's daughter Gudrun in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Gudrun Gudrun is the wife of the hero Sigurd in Norse mythology in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Gunnar Gunnar is a Norse king who marries Brynhild after he sends Sigurd to court her in disguise in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Hades/Pluto Zeus's brother Hades is given dominion over the underworld, the realm of the dead in Greek mythology, also called Pluto.
Harmonia Harmonia is the daughter of Aphrodite and Ares who marries Cadmus, the founder of Thebes, in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Hebe Hebe is the goddess of youth, the daughter of Zeus and Hera who marries Hercules in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Hecate Hecate is the goddess of night, associated with Artemis in Part 1, Chapter 1; in Part 4, Chapter 4 she dwells on the path to the underworld as a threatening presence capable of great harm and evil.
Hector Hector, son of King Priam, is the great Trojan hero of the Trojan War. Achilles kills him and drags his body behind a chariot before allowing his burial in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Hecuba Hecuba is the wife of Priam and mother of Paris, Hector, and Cassandra of Troy in Part 4, Chapters 1 and 2.
Heimdall Heimdall is a Norse god who guards the rainbow bridge to Asgard, the realm of the gods in Norse mythology in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Hela Hela is the Norse goddess of the dead in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Helen Helen's decision to leave her husband Menelaus and go to Troy with Paris leads the armies of Greece to wage war on Troy to get her back in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Helenus Helenus is a Trojan prophet who tells the Greeks they need Hercules's bow and arrows to win the war in Part 4, Chapter 2; he later marries Andromache.
Helios Helios is the father of Phaëthon and the Sun god who drives the chariot of the sun across the sky each day in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Helle Helle is the sister of Phrixus who is rescued by the ram with the Golden Fleece but falls into the sea before the siblings reach safety in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Hephaestus Hephaestus is the Greek god of the forge who crafts all the Olympians' armor and weapons; also known as Vulcan.
Hercules Hercules is the great hero who kills his family in madness and does penance by completing 12 labors of impossible strength and daring; he participates in other quests as well in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Hermione Hermione is the daughter of Helen of Troy who marries Achilles's son Neoptolemus in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Hero Hero is a priestess of Aphrodite who falls in love with a man who lives across the sea in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Hestia Hestia is the Greek goddess of the hearth and a symbol of home life; she does not figure prominently in mythical stories but serves an important purpose in home life.
Hippodamia Hippodamia is a princess who marries Pelops after he wins her hand in a chariot race in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Hippolytus Hippolytus is Theseus's son who is ultimately killed by his stepmother Phaedra's treachery when she wrongfully accuses him of violence toward her in Part 3, Chapter 2.
Hoder Hoder is the blind brother of Balder in Norse mythology; Loki tricks him into killing Balder in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Hyacinth After Apollo accidentally kills Hyacinth with a discus, flowers grow on the places his blood fell in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Hyades The Hyades are Atlas's daughters who raise the infant Dionysus in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Hydra Hydra is a creature with nine heads, one of which is immortal; when one of its heads is cut off, two grow in its place; Hercules kills Hydra by burning the stumps of the severed heads and burying the immortal one in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Hylas Hylas is Hercules's armor-bearer whose disappearance into the spring of a water nymph causes Hercules to abandon the Argonauts to search for his friend in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Hypermnestra Hypermnestra is one of the Danaïds and the only one among her sisters who does not kill her husband, Lynceus, in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Ibycus Ibycus is a poet whose robbery and death are avenged by cranes in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Icarus Icarus is Daedalus's son who escapes from the Labyrinth with his father, only to drown when he flies too close to the sun and melts the glue in his wings in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Idas Idas is a hunter who fights Apollo for the right to marry Marpessa in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Ino Ino is a princess of Thebes who plots against her husband's children from his first marriage in Part 2, Chapter 3; she later becomes a sea goddess in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Io Io is one of Zeus's lovers whom he turns into a cow to save her from Hera in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Ion Ion is the son of Creüsa and Apollo, abandoned at birth and raised by Apollo's priestess in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Iphicles Iphicles is Hercules's "twin" brother, as they are born together but have different fathers in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Iphigenia Iphigenia is Agamemnon's daughter who is sacrificed to ensure safe passage to Troy in Part 4, Chapter 1; in Part 5, Chapter 1 she escapes the sacrifice and becomes a priestess in a foreign land.
Iris Iris is the Greek goddess of the rainbow who serves as a messenger in a number of myths after Part 1, Chapter 1.
Ismene Ismene is Oedipus's younger daughter who is afraid to defy Creon and take part in burying her brother when he is killed in battle in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Itys Itys is the son of Procne and Tereus whose mother kills him and feeds him to Tereus as revenge for Tereus's mistreatment of Procne's sister Philomela in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Jason Jason is the Greek hero who leads the Quest of the Golden Fleece in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Jocasta Jocasta is a queen of Thebes who unwittingly marries her own son after her husband, Laius, is killed in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Jove Jove is a Roman name for Zeus that appears when he must destroy the Sun god's chariot in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Lachesis Lachesis is the Fate that assigns each man his destiny as his thread is spun in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Laius Laius is a king of Thebes who sends his infant son away to die because the oracle says the son will one day kill him in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Laocoön Laocoön is a Trojan priest who cautions his fellow citizens to beware of Greeks bearing gifts, but no one listens to him in Part 4, Chapter 2.
Latinus Latinus is the king of Latium who wants Aeneas to marry his daughter but not badly enough to oppose the will of his people when war breaks out in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Lavinia Lavinia is a princess of Latium who marries Aeneas after the war in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Leander Leander falls in love with Hero and swims across the Hellespont each night to see her in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Leda Leda is the mother of Zeus's twin sons, Castor and Pollux, and of their daughter, Helen of Troy.
Leto/Latona Leto/Latona is the mother of the gods Apollo and Artemis.
Linus Linus is a son of Apollo and a nymph whose death inspires harvest songs in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Loki Loki is the son of a Giant in Norse mythology and is known for his propensity for mischief and mayhem in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Lucifer Lucifer is the "star that brings in the day" and the father of King Ceyx of Thessaly in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Lycaon Lycaon is Callisto's father who is turned into a wolf for trying to feed Zeus human flesh in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Lycomedes King Lycomedes is a friend of Theseus who kills Theseus, though the stories are not clear about the cause in Part 3, Chapter 2.
Lynceus Lynceus is the husband of Hypermnestra, one of the Danaïds in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Maenads Maenads are female followers of Dionysus who often commit acts of horrible violence while under his influence in Part 1, Chapter 2.
Marpessa Marpessa is a nymph beloved by Apollo and the mortal Idas who chooses Idas because he will be faithful to her in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Marsyas Marsyas the satyr challenges Apollo to a music contest, and the god flays him when Marsyas loses in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Medea Medea's sorcery and love for Jason allow him to complete his quest, but he betrays her and marries another woman, leading her to revenge in Part 2, Chapter 3; she reappears in the story of Theseus in Part 3, Chapter 2.
Medusa Medusa is one of the Gorgons—serpent-like women with snakes for hair who can turn men to stone; she is killed by the hero Perseus in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Megara Megara is a Theban princess who marries Hercules and lives happily until he kills her and their children in a fit of madness in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Meleager Meleager is a prince of Calydon who falls in love with Atalanta and gives her credit for killing the boar in the Calydonian Hunt, which creates controversy and causes his death in Part 3, Chapter 4.
Melampus Melampus raises two pet snakes who teach him the language of animals in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Melanion Melanion is one of Atalanta's suitors who wins her hand by beating her in a foot race, but he does this by distracting her with golden apples in Part 3, Chapter 4.
Melicertes Melicertes is the son of Ino, a daughter of Cadmus of Thebes; his mother takes his body and leaps into the sea when he dies, and both of them are transformed into sea gods in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Melpomene Melpomene is the Muse of tragedy in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Memnon Memnon is the son of Tithonus and Aurora in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Menelaus Menelaus is the king of Sparta who calls on all his allies—all of Greece—to help him wage war on Troy when Paris steals his wife, Helen, in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Menoeceus Menoeceus is the son of Creon, regent of Thebes after Oedipus's disgrace; Menoeceus dies in battle against Polyneices after his father refuses to sacrifice him to end the war in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Merope Merope marries Hercules's son Cresphontes and avenges her husband's death in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Metaneira Metaneira takes the grieving goddess Demeter into her home thinking Demeter is an ordinary woman; she is furious when she discovers Demeter nursing her son, which ignites Demeter's own fury in Part 1, Chapter 2.
Mezentius Mezentius is the ousted king of the Etruscans who flees his home country when the people revolt against his cruel methods of killing his enemies in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Minos Minos is a king of Crete who builds the Labyrinth to house the Minotaur in Part 2, Chapter 4; he becomes an enemy of Athens in Part 3, Chapter 2 and becomes a judge in Hades when he dies.
Minotaur The Minotaur is a half-bull, half-man creature born to the queen of Crete after her husband angers Poseidon by refusing to sacrifice a bull to him; the Minotaur is imprisoned in a specially constructed Labyrinth until Theseus kills him in Part 3, Chapter 2.
Mnemosyne Mnemosyne is the Titan who represents memory in Greek mythology; she and Zeus are the parents of the nine Muses who inspire art and science in Part 1, Chapter 1.
The Myrmidons The Myrmidons are men created from ants who follow Achilles to the Trojan War in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Narcissus Narcissus is cursed to only love himself because he scorns all women; he turns into a flower after he wastes away looking at his own reflection in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Nausicaä Nausicaä finds Odysseus when he washes ashore on the island her father rules in Part 4, Chapter 3.
Neleus Neleus is the son of Poseidon and Tyro, and brother to Pelias in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Nemesis Nemesis is a lesser god associated with righteous anger; she may be responsible for Narcissus falling in love with his own reflection in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Neoptolemus Neoptolemus is Achilles's son who kills the Trojan king Priam at the end of the Trojan War in Part 4, Chapter 2; also called Pyrrhus.
Nephele Nephele is Athamas's first wife whose prayers for her children's safety bring the ram with the Golden Fleece in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Nestor Nestor is the Greek king of the city of Pylos, and the oldest and wisest commander of troops in the Trojan War who encourages Agamemnon to make peace with Achilles in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Niobe Niobe is the vain daughter of Tantalus whose arrogance leads her to provoke Apollo and Artemis to kill her seven children, leading her to turn to stone in grief in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Nisus Nisus is a king whose purple lock of hair makes him invincible, until his daughter Scylla cuts it off in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Notus Notus is the personification of the South Wind in Greek mythology.
Odin Odin, also known as the All-father, is the king of the gods and protector of mankind in Norse mythology in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Odysseus Odysseus, king of Ithaca, ends the Trojan War with his idea to build the Trojan Horse and wanders for 10 years on his way home because he displeased the gods in Part 4, Chapters 1, 2, and 3.
Oedipus Oedipus becomes king of Thebes and discovers he has, through a series of twists of fate, killed his father and married his own mother in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Oeneus Oeneus is the king of Calydon whose land is tormented by a wild boar because he forgets to sacrifice to Artemis at harvest time in Part 3, Chapter 4.
Oenone Paris abandons Oenone for Helen before the start of the Trojan War in Part 4, Chapter 1; she refuses to save his life in Part 4, Chapter 2.
Oenopion Oenopion prevents Orion from marrying his daughter and blinds him after he insults her in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Omphale Hercules does penance as a servant for Queen Omphale in Lydia, and she often dresses him as a woman for her amusement in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Orestes Orestes, Agamemnon's son, kills his mother to avenge his father's death, and his penance lifts the curse from the house of Atreus in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Orion Orion is a mighty hunter who is blinded by his would-be father-in-law in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Orithyia Orithyia is a princess of Athens who marries Boreas, the North Wind, against her family's wishes in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Orpheus Orpheus is a talented musician whose song convinces Hades to release his wife from death in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Otus Otus is one of two Giant sons of Poseidon who challenge the gods in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Uranus Uranus is the sky or Heavens; when he and Gaea (Earth) fall in love, the Titans and all other life are created in Part 1, Chapter 3.
Pan Pan is a minor forest god, half man, half goat, known for his musical talent in playing the flute in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Pandarus Pandarus is a Trojan soldier whom Athena inspires to fire an arrow during negotiations to end the war, which prolongs the fighting and leads to Troy's destruction in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Pandora Pandora is the first woman, and she unleashes the miseries of mankind when her curiosity leads her to open a box where they are all contained in Part 1, Chapter 3.
Paphos Paphos is the son of the sculptor Pygmalion and his wife, Galatea, in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Paris Paris is a prince of Troy whose judgment of goddess' beauty and abduction of Helen lead to the Trojan War in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Parthenopaeus Parthenopaeus is the son of Atalanta and Melanion in Part 3, Chapter 4.
Pasiphaë Poseidon drives Pasiphaë, the wife of King Minos of Crete, to fall in love with a bull when Minos refuses to sacrifice it; the union produces the terrifying Minotaur in Part 3, Chapter 2.
Patroclus Patroclus is Achilles's friend whose death moves Achilles to rejoin the battle at Troy and kill Hector in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Pegasus Pegasus is a legendary winged horse that appears in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Peleus Peleus is the father of Achilles whom Atalanta beats in a wrestling match in Part 3, Chapter 4; his wedding party begins the chain of events that leads to the Trojan War in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Pelias Pelias is Jason's uncle who sends Jason on a seemingly impossible quest, hoping Jason will no longer threaten his own power in Part 3, Chapter 2.
Pelops Pelops's father, Tantalus, kills Pelops and attempts to serve his flesh at a dinner for the gods; the gods punish Tantalus and revive Pelops, who goes on to live a happy life in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Penelope Odysseus's wife, Penelope, must devise clever ways to delay the suitors who pursue her while Odysseus is away in Part 4, Chapter 3.
Peneus Peneus is a river god who turns his daughter Daphne into a laurel tree when she begs him for help to evade Apollo in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Pentheus Pentheus is a cousin of Dionysus who does not recognize the god's power and tries to imprison him; as retribution, Pentheus is later torn apart by a group of women crazed on wine.
Persephone/Proserpine Persephone/Proserpine is Demeter's daughter who marries Hades and must spend half the year in the underworld and half with her mother, giving rise to the seasons in Part 1, Chapter 2.
Perseus Perseus is a hero who kills the Gorgon Medusa and saves his future wife, Andromeda, from a sea serpent in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Phaedra After Ariadne dies, Theseus marries her sister Phaedra who sows discord between Theseus and his son Hippolytus in Part 3, Chapter 2.
Phaëthon Phaëthon is the Sun god's son who asks to drive his father's chariot and loses control of the horses, almost setting the world ablaze in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Philemon Philemon is an old man from Phrygia who, with his wife, Baucis, welcomes Jupiter and Mercury (disguised as travelers) into his home and is rewarded in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Philoctetes Philoctetes is a Greek soldier who owns Hercules's bow and arrows and uses them to mortally wound Paris in Part 4, Chapter 2.
Philomela Philomela is a princess of Athens whose brother-in-law tricks her into a sham marriage, then cuts out her tongue and imprisons her to prevent her exposing him in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Phineus Phineus is a prophet cursed by Zeus who provides the Argonauts with advice in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Phrixus Phrixus is a prince rescued from his stepmother's plot against him by a ram in Part 2, Chapter 3.
Pirithoüs Pirithoüs becomes Theseus's friend in the Calydonian boar hunt, but ends his life in the Chair of Forgetfulness in Hades after he attempts to kidnap Persephone in Part 3, Chapter 2.
The Pleiades The Pleiades are seven daughters of Atlas who become stars in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Pollux Pollux is the twin brother of Castor, but he is also the son of Zeus, while Castor is mortal; he shares his immortality with his brother when Castor is killed in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Polybus Polybus is a king of Corinth who takes in the infant Odysseus and raises him as his own in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Polydectes Polydectes is a king who wants to marry Danaë, so he sends her son Perseus on a deadly quest to fetch the head of Medusa in Part 3, Chapter 1.
Polyhymnia Polyhymnia is the Muse of songs to the gods (hymns) in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Polyneices Oedipus's son Polyneices enters a battle against his younger brother Eteocles when Eteocles takes the throne of Thebes in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Polyphemus The Cyclops Polyphemus captures and eats some of Odysseus's men and is blinded in their escape; later, he falls in love with a nymph in Part 1, Chapter 4.
Polyphontes Polyphontes takes Cresphontes's throne and his wife Merope, inspiring her to seek revenge in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Pomona Pomona is an orchard nymph reluctant to marry until she gives Vertumnus a chance in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Pontus Pontus is a Greek sea god who represents the deepest levels of the sea in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Priam Priam is the king of Troy during the Trojan War and the father of Paris and the Trojan hero Hector in Part 4, Chapters 1 and 2.
Procne Procne is a princess of Athens who gets revenge on her husband, Tereus, for abusing her sister by killing their son and tricking Tereus into eating the body in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Procris Procris is the wife of Cephalus who leaves him after he baselessly accuses her of infidelity in Part 6, Chapter 1, but he eventually wins her back.
Prometheus Prometheus is the Titan who creates mankind, giving them gifts that separate them from the animals and angering Zeus because he shows too much favor to humans; Prometheus is punished by being chained to a rock on a mountain where an eagle comes to eat his liver every day in Part 1, Chapter 3.
Proteus 1 Proteus is a king of Argos who comes into conflict with Bellerophon and sends him on quests in Part 2, Chapter 4.
Proteus 2 Proteus is a sea god who is able to change his shape in Part 1, Chapter 1, and Part 6, Chapter 2.
Psyche Psyche, whose name means Soul, marries Cupid in Part 2, Chapter 1, uniting Love and the Soul forever.
Pygmalion Pygmalion is a sculptor who falls in love with one of his creations, and his prayers to Aphrodite bring the statue to life in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Pylades Pylades is a friend of Agamemnon's son Orestes who helps Orestes avenge his father's death in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Pyramus Pyramus is a young man who falls in love and tries to run away with his neighbor Thisbe, but he kills himself when he thinks she has been killed by a lion in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Pyrrha Pyrrha is Prometheus's niece who, with Deucalion, reestablishes the human race after Zeus destroys the world in a flood in Part 1, Chapter 3.
Rhadamanthus Rhadamanthus is a son of Zeus and Europa in Part 1, Chapter 4, who becomes a judge in the underworld after his death.
Rhea Rhea is the Titan mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, and Hestia.
Rhoecus Rhoecus has a tryst with a wood nymph that ends with his blinding in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Salmoneus Salmoneus is a king who pretends to be Zeus and incurs the god's wrath in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Scylla 1 Scylla was a sea nymph, but Circe turns her into a many-headed monster anchored to a rock in the sea and lashing out at sailors in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Scylla 2 Scylla takes her father's lock of hair that makes him invincible because she loves King Minos in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Selene Selene is the goddess of the moon who falls in love with Endymion and places him in eternal sleep in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Semele Semele is a Theban princess who has an ill-fated affair with Zeus that results in the birth of Dionysus, the god of wine in Part 1, Chapter 2.
The Sibyl The Sibyl of Cumae is a prophetess who escorts Aeneas through the underworld in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Sigmund Sigmund is a Norse hero who helps his sister Signy avenge their father's murder in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Signy Signy is a Norse heroine who avenges her father's death at her husband's hands in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Sigurd Sigurd is a Norse hero who loves Brynhild but is tricked into marrying another woman in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Silenus Silenus is a drunk man King Midas helps, which earns Midas the chance to ask a favor from Bacchus in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Sinfiotli Sinfiotli is the son of Sigmund and Signy who helps his parents avenge his grandfather's death in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Sinon Sinon convinces the Trojans to take the Trojan Horse into their city with a tale of his own near sacrifice and abandonment by his fellow soldiers in Part 4, Chapter 2.
Sisyphus Sisyphus is doomed in Hades to roll a boulder uphill for all eternity in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Skuld Skuld is the personification of the Future in Norse mythology in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Socrates Socrates is a real-life philosopher of ancient Athens who questions whether the myths are real in Part 5, Chapter 3.
The Sphinx The Sphinx has the head of a woman and the body of a lion; she asks a riddle of travelers and kills them when they are unable to answer in Part 5, Chapter 2.
Tantalus Tantalus kills his son and attempts to feed him to the gods, so he is cursed to an eternity of hunger and thirst with food and water tantalizingly just out of reach in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Teiresias Teiresias is the blind prophet who reveals the truth about Oedipus in Part 5, Chapter 2. He also provides counsel to Odysseus and Aeneas in Part 4, Chapters 3 and 4.
Telemachus Telemachus is Odysseus's son who assists him in ridding their home of Penelope's suitors in Part 4, Chapter 3.
Tereus Tereus marries Procne of Athens but tricks her sister Philomela into a sham marriage, then imprisons her when she threatens to expose his lies in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Terpsichore Terpsichore is the Muse of dance in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Thalia Thalia is the Muse of comedy in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Theseus Theseus is a hero and king of Athens, beloved for his strength and his sense of reason in Part 3, Chapter 2; he attempts to comfort Hercules in Part 3, Chapter 3.
Thetis Thetis is a sea nymph and the mother of Achilles who attempts to protect him from death by dipping him in the River Styx and preventing him from going to the Trojan War in Part 4, Chapters 1 and 2.
Thisbe Thisbe is a young woman who kills herself when she discovers her lover, Pyramus, is dead in Part 2, Chapter 2.
Thoas Thoas is the king of the Taurians who takes in Agamemnon's daughter Iphigenia in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Thor Thor is the Norse god of thunder in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Thyestes Thyestes is the brother of Atreus who is tricked into cannibalism as punishment for sleeping with his brother's wife in Part 5, Chapter 1.
Tithonus Tithonus is granted immortality but not eternal youth, so he spends eternity as a withered old man in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Turnus Turnus leads armies of Latins and Rutulians against Aeneas, but he is eventually defeated in battle in Part 4, Chapter 4.
Tyndareus Helen's father on earth makes her suitors swear allegiance to the one she marries, as a measure of protecting his own interests in Part 4, Chapter 1.
Tyr Tyr is the Norse god of war in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Tyro Tyro has twin sons with Poseidon, one of whom becomes Pelias who sends Jason for the Golden Fleece in Part 6, Chapter 2.
Ulysses The Romans know the Greek hero Odysseus as Ulysses.
Urania Urania is the Muse of astronomy in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Urda Urda is the Norse personification of the Past in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Verdandi Verdandi is the Norse personification of the Present in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Vertumnus Vertumnus convinces the nymph Pomona to marry him by disguising himself as an old woman and comparing Pomona to a vine who needs a tree for support in Part 6, Chapter 1.
Volsung Volsung is the father of the Norse hero Sigmund and heroine Signy who avenge his death in Part 7, Chapter 1.
Xuthus Xuthus marries Creüsa and accepts Ion as his own son at Apollo's urging in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Yggdrasil Yggdrasil is the tree that anchors the world in Norse mythology in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Ymir In Norse myth, Ymir is the Giant father of Odin whose body Odin uses to make the world in Part 7, Chapter 2.
Zephyr Zephyr is the Greek personification of the West Wind in Part 1, Chapter 1.
Zetes Zetes is the son of Boreas and Orithyia, and the brother of Calais in Part 5, Chapter 3.
Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about Mythology? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!