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Course Hero. "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Study Guide." Course Hero. 28 July 2016. Web. 19 Sep. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Narrative-of-the-Life-of-Frederick-Douglass/>.

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Course Hero. (2016, July 28). Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved September 19, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Narrative-of-the-Life-of-Frederick-Douglass/

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Course Hero. "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Study Guide." July 28, 2016. Accessed September 19, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Narrative-of-the-Life-of-Frederick-Douglass/.

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Course Hero, "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Study Guide," July 28, 2016, accessed September 19, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Narrative-of-the-Life-of-Frederick-Douglass/.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass | Discussion Questions 51 - 52

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In Chapter 11 of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Douglass cannot to find work in his profession due to prejudice. How does New Bedford compare with Baltimore?

Just as white carpenters refused to work with black carpenters in Baltimore, white caulkers refuse to work with black caulkers in New Bedford. Thus, Douglass is unable to use the trade he learned. Douglass does not seem particularly bothered by this and simply finds another job. For all their wealth and progressiveness, the citizens of New Bedford, and the North in general, have a way to go before they learn that people of all colors should be treated equally. While Douglass is not beaten due to his race in New Bedford, as he was in Baltimore, he still suffers because of the color of his skin. Treating people differently because of race is acceptable in New Bedford, and no one, not even Douglass, seems especially bothered.

What is the purpose of the appendix in the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass?

The appendix is used to explain Douglass's religious thoughts and observations. Upon reviewing the narrative in its initial draft, Douglass may have come to the conclusion that the book seems anti-Christian. This conclusion is logical, as Douglass mentions several times in the book that religious slaveholders are the worst type. Douglass himself was a Christian. In addition, many abolitionists and their followers were Christians. Such people would have been the likely readers of the book. To avoid turning off his readers, the appendix clarifies Douglass's thoughts on religion and how Christianity in the South—especially Christian slaveholders—is different from Christianity in the North. Christians in the South have corrupted the religion.

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