Literature Study GuidesOranges Are Not The Only Fruit

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit | Study Guide

Jeanette Winterson

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Study Guide
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Course Hero. "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit Study Guide." Course Hero. 11 Dec. 2017. Web. 20 July 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Oranges-Are-Not-the-Only-Fruit/>.

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(Course Hero)

APA

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Course Hero. (2017, December 11). Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved July 20, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Oranges-Are-Not-the-Only-Fruit/

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(Course Hero, 2017)

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Bibliography

Course Hero. "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit Study Guide." December 11, 2017. Accessed July 20, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Oranges-Are-Not-the-Only-Fruit/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit Study Guide," December 11, 2017, accessed July 20, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Oranges-Are-Not-the-Only-Fruit/.

Overview

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit infographic thumbnail

Author

Jeanette Winterson

Year Published

1985

Type

Novel

Genre

Fiction

Perspective and Narrator

The semiautobiographical novel Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is written from the first-person point of view as told by the author, who acts as the narrator. However, the narration is regularly interrupted by third-person recountings of traditional and religious stories Jeanette hears from her mother, Jeanette's dreams told as stories, and an elaborate fairy tale she creates to try to make sense of her own life.

Tense

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is written in the past tense.

About the Title

The title Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit comes from a statement Jeanette's mother makes near the end of the novel, reversing her previous position on the topic. Until this point she has considered them "the only fruit" and mentions them frequently around the house. The shift mirrors Jeanette's mother's change in attitude toward her daughter, whom she rejected for being a lesbian but whom she seems to accept more at the end of the novel. Just as Jeanette questions her mother about why she cannot have any other fruit besides oranges, she questions why the only acceptable sexuality for her mother and her church is heterosexuality within the confines of marriage.

Summary

This study guide and infographic for Jeanette Winterson's Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit offer summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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