Literature Study GuidesPilgrim At Tinker Creek

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek | Study Guide

Annie Dillard

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MLA

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Course Hero. "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek Study Guide." Course Hero. 26 Sep. 2017. Web. 18 Dec. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Pilgrim-at-Tinker-Creek/>.

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(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2017, September 26). Pilgrim at Tinker Creek Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved December 18, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Pilgrim-at-Tinker-Creek/

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(Course Hero, 2017)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek Study Guide." September 26, 2017. Accessed December 18, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Pilgrim-at-Tinker-Creek/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek Study Guide," September 26, 2017, accessed December 18, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Pilgrim-at-Tinker-Creek/.

Overview

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek infographic thumbnail

Author

Annie Dillard

Year Published

1974

Type

Nonfiction

Genre

Nature, Religion

At a Glance

Ostensibly about a year of Annie Dillard's observations of plant and animal life in and around Tinker Creek in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek is far more than a nature book. Dillard always intended it to be metaphysical—to go beyond the physical and sensory world to encompass abstract concepts about truth, existence, and spirituality. It is a religious seeker's journal that looks unflinchingly at both the beauty and horror of the natural world, asking why existence should be as it is and trying to finding an acceptable answer. Published when Dillard was only 29, the book became an immediate best seller. It won the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction in 1975 and has since become a modern classic.

Perspective and Narrator

Annie Dillard is the author and first-person narrator of Pilgrim at Tinker Creek.

About the Title

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek refers to Annie Dillard and her quest—a pilgrimage, or spiritual journey—to understand God through the natural phenomena she witnesses at Tinker Creek. Rather than go to a shrine or holy city, as religious people have done for centuries, she goes to the creek running through her own backyard.

Summary

This study guide and infographic for Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek offer summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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