Poems of Emily Dickinson (Selected) | Study Guide

Emily Dickinson

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Poems of Emily Dickinson (Selected) Study Guide." Course Hero. 13 Apr. 2018. Web. 16 July 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Poems-of-Emily-Dickinson-Selected/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2018, April 13). Poems of Emily Dickinson (Selected) Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved July 16, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Poems-of-Emily-Dickinson-Selected/

In text

(Course Hero, 2018)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Poems of Emily Dickinson (Selected) Study Guide." April 13, 2018. Accessed July 16, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Poems-of-Emily-Dickinson-Selected/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Poems of Emily Dickinson (Selected) Study Guide," April 13, 2018, accessed July 16, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Poems-of-Emily-Dickinson-Selected/.

Poems of Emily Dickinson (Selected) | Poem Summaries

Share
Share

Poem Summaries Chart

Poem Summary
It's all I have to bring today— The speaker says all she has to bring to the reader are the poem and her heart but then adds she's bringing the fields a... Read More
Heart! We will forget him! This two-stanza poem deviates from ballad meter in a few ways. The first line consists of only six syllables instead of ... Read More
Success is counted sweetest This three-stanza poem in ballad meter deviates from the typical iambic tetrameter in the odd-numbered lines (with the e... Read More
She died—this was the way she died This two-stanza poem in ballad meter deviates from iambic meter in the first line. The second and fourth lines of both s... Read More
"Faith" is a fine invention This single stanza in ballad meter deviates from Dickinson's typical use of iambic meter only in the first line, which h... Read More
Two swimmers wrestled on the spar— In this poem, which consists of two stanzas of ballad meter, two swimmers are wrestling or struggling in the ocean on a ... Read More
I taste a liquor never brewed— This poem consists of four stanzas, which, with minor exceptions, adhere to Dickinson's typical use of ballad meter. In ... Read More
Wild nights—Wild nights! The lines in this three-stanza poem are shorter than typical lines of ballad meter or of Dickinson's other poems. Typica... Read More
"Hope" is the thing with feathers— The poem deviates from Dickinson's typical use of ballad meter only in the first line, which begins with the stressed sy... Read More
There's a certain Slant of light, This poem departs from Dickinson's typical use of ballad meter in that most of its lines are shorter than usual by one o... Read More
I felt a Funeral, in my Brain, This poem, which consists of five stanzas of ballad meter, documents the process of a mental breakdown or possibly a fai... Read More
I'm Nobody! Who are you? In this two-stanza poem in ballad meter, the speaker announces she is a "Nobody." Then, having ascertained her silent ad... Read More
The Soul selects her own Society— This three-stanza poem deviates from ballad meter in an unusual way. While in typical ballad meter the odd-numbered line... Read More
A Bird, came down the Walk— The meter of this five-stanza poem differs somewhat from Dickinson's usual ballad meter. In the first three stanzas, the... Read More
After great pain, a formal feeling comes— In this three-stanza poem the meter is irregular and top-heavy. Instead of the usual alternating lines of four iambic fe... Read More
Much Madness is divinest Sense— The meter of this two-stanza poem deviates somewhat from Dickinson's typical use of ballad meter. While the first two li... Read More
This is my letter to the World In this two-stanza poem, which generally adheres to standard ballad meter, the speaker tells those who would be her read... Read More
I heard a Fly buzz—when I died— This four-stanza poem for the most part follows standard ballad meter, and the poet uses slant rhyme in the second and f... Read More
The Brain—is wider than the Sky— The three stanzas of this poem, which adhere to Dickinson's typical use of standard ballad meter, describe the brain. In... Read More
I dwell in Possibility— This three-stanza poem follows standard ballad meter for the most part, although some lines that would normally contain ... Read More
Because I could not stop for Death— In this six-stanza poem, Dickinson uses standard ballad meter for the most part with the exception of the first two line... Read More
My Life had stood—a Loaded Gun— In this poem, written in Dickinson's usual ballad meter, the speaker compares herself to a loaded gun, sitting passively... Read More
Tell all the Truth but tell it slant— This didactic poem, written in Dickinson's usual ballad meter, gives a clear, simple lesson about telling the truth. One... Read More
There is no Frigate like a Book This poem, written in Dickinson's usual ballad meter, uses metaphors of travel and transportation to extol the power of ... Read More
Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about Poems of Emily Dickinson (Selected)? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!