Pride and Prejudice | Study Guide

Jane Austen

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Chapter 30

Professor Bradley Greenburg of Northeastern Illinois University provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 30 of Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice.

Pride and Prejudice | Chapter 30 (Volume 2, Chapter 7) | Summary

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Summary

After a weeklong visit, Mr. Lucas leaves Hunsford. He is satisfied that his daughter has a good life with Mr. Collins. During the remainder of Elizabeth's visit, she and Charlotte avoid Mr. Collins as much as possible. Lady Catherine visits occasionally, criticizing everything in sight, and Mr. and Mrs. Collins and their guest also dine at Rosings several more times. Mr. Collins consults Lady Catherine about everything going on in the parish (the community he serves as a clergyman).

Then there is news that Lady Catherine's nephew, Mr. Darcy, along with his cousin Colonel Fitzwilliam, will be visiting Rosings. The pair pay a visit to the Collins home as well. Elizabeth finds the Colonel to be pleasant and Darcy aloof. When she asks Darcy if he has seen Jane in London, he says he has not. Charlotte suggests that Darcy has come to the area specifically to see Elizabeth.

Analysis

Austen makes fun of Lady Catherine's snobbery, but she also paints a portrait of a formidable woman who involves herself in every dispute in her community, even though it is not a woman's role to do so—even a noblewoman's.

If Darcy has come to see Elizabeth, his cool behavior doesn't show it. Elizabeth needles Darcy with her question about Jane; she thinks he looks confused as he responds, foreshadowing future revelations about his role in keeping Jane away from Bingley.

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