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Pride and Prejudice | Infographic

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Check out this Infographic to learn more about Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Study visually with character maps, plot summaries, helpful context, and more.

pride-and-prejudice-jane-austenPride and Prejudiceby the NumbersPrice Jane Austen sold the books copyright to publisher Thomas Egerton in 1813£110Mr. CollinsCharlesBingleyThe TiesThat BindMAIN CHARACTERSNarrator, Chapter 1 t is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.LoveOften secondary to the desire for better social connections, true love is displayed as equal connection, outside of societys influences, and able to conquer even the most difficult of circumstances.ClassClosely tied to both wealth and reputation, social standing and affluence are not necessarily advantages to ones character and are a primary source of hardship and dispute. ReputationFirst impressions are difficult to change and influence all future social interaction. The consequences of ones reputation have varying degrees of gravity, reminding readers of the inevitability of its effects.CourtshipDisguises and reveals ones hidden character—an opportunity to play at love or abuse it as a means of social advancementMarriageExemplifies the consequences of ones choices during courtshipwhether happy, miserable, or stableIn an era when women relied on marriage for financial and societal stability, Elizabeth Bennet balks at a safe union and advocates marriage for love above all else. When she encounters the wealthy and seemingly arrogant Fitzwilliam Darcy, both must learn to overcome their pride and prejudices to find happiness for themselves and their families. ElizabethBennetLady Catherinede BourghGeorgeWickhamJaneMrs.BennetMr. DarcyMaryLydiaGeorgianaDarcyCharlotteLucasAnnede BourghCarolineBingleyMr.BennetKittyNow widely considered one of the greatest writers in English history, Austen saw only moderate success in her lifetime, publishing under the vague pseudonym A Woman.” Known for her witty examinations of social constructs (and for never marrying), Austen wrote novels praised for bridging the gap between romance and realism.JANE AUSTEN1775–1817Endless LoveMore than two centuries old, Pride and Prejudice remains one of the most beloved and commonly referenced narratives in literature. Originally titled First Impressions, it has become the prototype of the modern romantic comedy—depicting misjudgments, amusing misunderstandings, and eventual feelings of love and affection.“ Pride and Prejudice is the matrix on which all Harlequin romances are built. It's the best-selling plot-line in literature.”Germaine Greer (born 1939), Australian-born feminist authorJourneyRepresents catalyst for changeand revelation16>20MCopies of Pride and Prejudice sold worldwideRank of Pride and Prejudice in a 2003 BBC reader survey of best-loved novels in Britain#2MARRIESMARRIESSISTERSFRIENDSMARRIEDINTENDED ATTRACTEDFRIENDSPROPOSES ATTRACTEDSIBLINGSAUNT MOTHERSIBLINGSMARRIESMARRIESPROPOSES SISTERSFATHERMOTHERSISTERSSISTERSAttractionProposalMarriageFriendshipFamilyYears between when the first version of First Impressions was written and the final version of Pride and Prejudice was publishedJane Austen1813EnglishNovelAuthorYear PublishedOriginal LanguageRomancePride andPrejudiceMotifsAuthorContextThemesCopyright © 2016 Course Hero, Inc.Sources: The Atlantic, BBC, Biography.com, Brandeis University,Chicago Public Library, The Independent

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