Prometheus Bound | Study Guide

Aeschylus

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Course Hero. "Prometheus Bound Study Guide." Course Hero. 9 Mar. 2018. Web. 2 June 2020. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Prometheus-Bound/>.

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Course Hero. (2018, March 9). Prometheus Bound Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved June 2, 2020, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Prometheus-Bound/

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Course Hero. "Prometheus Bound Study Guide." March 9, 2018. Accessed June 2, 2020. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Prometheus-Bound/.

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Course Hero, "Prometheus Bound Study Guide," March 9, 2018, accessed June 2, 2020, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Prometheus-Bound/.

Prometheus Bound | Stasimon 1 | Summary

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Summary

The Chorus says it is weeping for Prometheus and Zeus, like a tyrant, rules by "laws of his own invention." Mortals all over the world weep for the fate of Prometheus and the other Titans. Only one other Titan is suffering alone as Prometheus is: Atlas, with whom all the waters of the world weep in sympathy.

Analysis

Once again, the Chorus seems to establish the norm, to reflect how people in the audience would feel about the current situation. They weep for Prometheus, as do all the peoples of Europe, the Amazons, the Scythians, and the warlike princes of Arabia. Prometheus's suffering is unique in all the world; only that of Atlas is comparable.

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