Romeo and Juliet | Study Guide

William Shakespeare

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Course Hero. "Romeo and Juliet Study Guide." Course Hero. 28 July 2016. Web. 17 Oct. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Romeo-and-Juliet/>.

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Course Hero. (2016, July 28). Romeo and Juliet Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved October 17, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Romeo-and-Juliet/

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Course Hero. "Romeo and Juliet Study Guide." July 28, 2016. Accessed October 17, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Romeo-and-Juliet/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Romeo and Juliet Study Guide," July 28, 2016, accessed October 17, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Romeo-and-Juliet/.

Act 2, Scene 6

Professor Regina Buccola of Roosevelt University provides in-depth summary and analysis of Act 2, Scene 6 of William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet.

Romeo and Juliet | Act 2, Scene 6 | Summary

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Summary

Romeo and Friar Lawrence make the final marital arrangements, with Romeo commenting that, no matter what happens next, his present joy can't be outdone by any sorrow. Even if death "devours" their love, the relationship will have been worth it. In turn Friar Lawrence warns Romeo to be less intense, to "love moderately." Juliet arrives, and the three retreat for the wedding ceremony that will "incorporate two in one."

Analysis

When Romeo swears any ensuing sorrows are worth even a minute of joy in Juliet's presence, he seems to have a sense of their love being dangerously brief. Yet he doesn't care, thanks to the intensity of his current pleasure that he can "call her mine."

Despite the friar's insisting that "long love" is the result of moderation, he prepares to marry Romeo and Juliet. He also promises to chaperone them properly: "you shall not stay alone,/Till Holy Church incorporate two in one." This also raises the question, perhaps, of what happens to the individual in such a formula. Does a loss of self accompany the union with another? As the rest of the play will show, their identities grow so merged that neither can envision life without the other.

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