Schindler's List | Study Guide

Thomas Keneally

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Course Hero. "Schindler's List Study Guide." Course Hero. 11 May 2017. Web. 16 Oct. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Schindlers-List/>.

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Course Hero. "Schindler's List Study Guide." May 11, 2017. Accessed October 16, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Schindlers-List/.

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Course Hero, "Schindler's List Study Guide," May 11, 2017, accessed October 16, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Schindlers-List/.

Schindler's List | Chapter 30 | Summary

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Summary

Schindler receives orders that Emalia is to be disbanded as soon as possible and the prisoners sent to Płaszów, after which they will be relocated to other camps where they will likely be exterminated. Returning to Płaszów, many prisoners feel hopeless, but a hopeful rumor soon emerges: Schindler may have plans to buy them back.

One evening at Amon Goeth's villa, Schindler tells Goeth he wishes to move his operations to Czechoslovakia, taking skilled workers from Emalia and Płaszów with him. Goeth agrees to allow Schindler to take workers from Płaszów, knowing Schindler will compensate him generously with gifts. The two men begin to bet money on blackjack, and Goeth is losing. Schindler proposes that if he wins the next hand, he will win the right to take Helen Hirsch, Goeth's maid, to Czechoslovakia. Schindler wins the hand and secures from Goeth a written guarantee of Hirsch's freedom.

Analysis

While many of Emalia's workers feel hopeless when they are sent to Płaszów, Schindler is undaunted by the orders to close his factory. He realizes the closure of the Polish camps gives him a great opportunity to save his workers. He secures Goeth's cooperation, as usual, by bribing him. Driven by his own greed, Goeth permits Schindler to make his list.

Thus far, lists have been tools used by the regime for tallying condemned Jews. In Schindler's hands, the list means mercy rather than persecution. Those on Schindler's list will have their lives spared. To the regime, the individual names on their lists meant nothing. For Schindler, each name on his list is an individual human being worthy of being saved. He demonstrates his willingness to bargain for a single individual by convincing Goeth to wager Helen Hirsch during a game of blackjack.

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