Literature Study GuidesSoliloquy Of The Spanish Cloister

Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister | Study Guide

Robert Browning

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Course Hero. "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Study Guide." Course Hero. 4 Jan. 2019. Web. 22 Jan. 2019. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Soliloquy-of-the-Spanish-Cloister/>.

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Course Hero. (2019, January 4). Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved January 22, 2019, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Soliloquy-of-the-Spanish-Cloister/

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(Course Hero, 2019)

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Bibliography

Course Hero. "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Study Guide." January 4, 2019. Accessed January 22, 2019. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Soliloquy-of-the-Spanish-Cloister/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Study Guide," January 4, 2019, accessed January 22, 2019, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Soliloquy-of-the-Spanish-Cloister/.

Overview

Author

Robert Browning

Year Published

1842

Type

Poem

Genre

Drama

Perspective and Narrator

"Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" is narrated from the perspective of a Spanish monk. The poem begins with a second-person address to Brother Lawrence, the devout monk whom the narrator detests, but is told mostly from a first-person perspective.

Tense

The poem is written in the present tense.

About the Title

The poem is a dramatic monologue, not a proper soliloquy. In a soliloquy the speaker utters his thoughts aloud, and the focus is on the emotions created by the speech. A monologue addresses a speaker's state of mind in a specific situation, particularly as it relates to emotional relationships between characters, as in a play. Meaning in dramatic monologues is often created unintentionally through the speaking character's expressions. "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" was originally published as "Cloister (Spanish)" in 1842, but the title was changed to the current one in 1849. The latter title, like the former, highlights the speaker's intention, but inability, to keep his thoughts silent, almost as in a confessional.

Summary

This study guide for Robert Browning's Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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