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Tartuffe | Infographic

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Check out this Infographic to learn more about Molière's Tartuffe. Study visually with character maps, plot summaries, helpful context, and more.

Elmire, Act 4, Scene 3 marvel at your power to be mistaken. Sources: Biography.com, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Molière: The Theory and Practice of Comedy by Andrew Calder Copyright © 2017 Course Hero, Inc. Gullibility From the moment they meet, Orgon is Tartuffe’s devoted dupe. Moderation & Reason Cléante recommends examining all the evidence before acting. Hypocrisy Tartuffe makes a show of his piety, but he’s out to do harm. Themes Orgon’s young second wife; finally convinces Orgon to see Tartuffe for what he is Elmire Orgon’s levelheaded brother-in-law; can’t make Orgon see the truth Cléante PrincipiaPhilosophiae Renatus Cartesius Clever impostor; uses the appearance of piety to run a dastardly con on Orgon Tartuffe Wealthy gentleman and strict patriarch; won't hear a word against Tartuffe Orgon Main Characters The master French comedy playwright Molière was a Parisian to the core and lived much of his life among the nobility and upper classes. He used his sharp wit to satirize what he saw there. In Tartuffe, he targeted hypocrisy dressed as piety, offending some church factions and earning the play a five-year ban. MOLIÈRE1622–73 Author Orgon has been taken in by Tartuffe—and soon he will be thrown out. Freed from Earthly Loves Tartuffe cloaks his lust and greed in the trappings of piety. Picture of Piety Orgon’s household members see Tartuffe for the fraud and threat he is. He’s a Hypocrite! A wealthy gentleman named Orgon meets Tartuffe, a pious pauper, at church and invites Tartuffe to live in his home. Soon Tartuffe is pulling Orgon’s strings and dominating the house. No one can convince Orgon to see beneath Tartuffe’s pious surface until it’s too late. All That GlittersIs Not Gold OVERVIEW French Original Language 1664 First Performed Molière Author Tartuffe Comedy Play

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