The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People | Study Guide

Stephen Covey

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Course Hero. "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Study Guide." Course Hero. 10 Nov. 2017. Web. 16 July 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-7-Habits-of-Highly-Effective-People/>.

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Course Hero. (2017, November 10). The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved July 16, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-7-Habits-of-Highly-Effective-People/

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Course Hero. "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Study Guide." November 10, 2017. Accessed July 16, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-7-Habits-of-Highly-Effective-People/.

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Course Hero, "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Study Guide," November 10, 2017, accessed July 16, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-7-Habits-of-Highly-Effective-People/.

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People | Part 3, Habit 6 : Synergize (Public Victory) | Summary

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Key Takeaways

  • Covey defines synergy as the whole being greater "than the sum of its parts." It means "one plus one equals three or more."
  • In practice synergy is creative cooperation between two or more parties to come to a mutually beneficial arrangement and is the "essence of principle-centered leadership."
  • Synergistic relationships embrace and build on different ideas and viewpoints.
  • Trust and cooperation are necessary for synergy to occur.
  • When levels of trust and cooperation between two parties are low, such as in Win/Lose or Lose/Win situations, the relationship is defensive. Each party is worried only about its own interests.
  • When levels of trust and cooperation are at a respectful, middling level, compromise occurs. Compromise may be acceptable, but it's not the best solution; it's a low-level Win/Win. The hallmark of a higher Win/Win mindset is high levels of trust and cooperation.
  • Successful synergistic relationships start with two or more conflicting goals in mind. Parties work together to find the "third alternative," which is "a solution that is mutually beneficial and is better than what either [party] originally proposed" and is more of a transformation than a transaction.
  • Covey believes "the key to interpersonal synergy is intrapersonal synergy," or the synergy within oneself. Having intrapersonal synergy requires the foundation of Habits 1–5.
  • Synergy is particularly helpful in breaking through "force fields." A force field is a state of equilibrium caused by "the driving forces that encourage upward movement and the restraining forces that discourage it." Driving forces are positive, like reason and logic. Restraining forces are often negative, like emotions and unconscious biases. They are the cause of the common lament that things can't be changed: it's just the way they are.
  • A synergistic relationship breaks down these barriers by allowing people to talk about restraining forces and turn them into driving forces. The key is open, honest communication and a willingness to be vulnerable, as taught in Habit 5.
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