The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Study Guide

Mark Twain

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Course Hero. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Study Guide." October 27, 2016. Accessed April 19, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/.

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Course Hero, "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Study Guide," October 27, 2016, accessed April 19, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/.

Chapter 30

Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 30 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Chapter 30 | Summary

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Summary

Once the two con men are on the raft, the king grabs Huck and accuses him of trying to leave the duke and him behind. Huck tells him a story, but the king is ready to drown him till the duke steps in. He says anyone would have done what Huck did in his situation.

Both the duke and the king believe that the other one put the money in the coffin and will eventually go back and get it for himself. The duke forces the king to say that he did it. Then they get drunk and act friendly towards each other; all is apparently forgiven. When they are asleep Huck tells Jim everything that happened.

Analysis

To this point the duke and the king have been cold, greedy, thieves. When the king threatens violence against Huck, the two con men show a whole new side. They will use violence if they deem it necessary. This adds another element as to why Huck desires to be away from the duke and the king. It is one thing to be disgusted by their immoral behavior, but Huck now has reason to fear them.

The way the duke and the king turn on each other is a testament to their base characters. Both the king and the duke are selfish people who only look out for themselves. They assume the other one is the same way. While they supposedly make up at the end of this chapter, they are certain to fight if tension rises again because they do not trust each other.

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