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Course Hero. "The Color Purple Study Guide." Course Hero. 15 Sep. 2016. Web. 22 June 2017. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Color-Purple/>.

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Course Hero. (2016, September 15). The Color Purple Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved June 22, 2017, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Color-Purple/

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Course Hero. "The Color Purple Study Guide." September 15, 2016. Accessed June 22, 2017. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Color-Purple/.

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Course Hero, "The Color Purple Study Guide," September 15, 2016, accessed June 22, 2017, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Color-Purple/.

The Color Purple | Symbols

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Pants

Pants represent independence, individuality, and strength to Celie as she liberates herself from Mr. ___'s control. They help her to breach gender lines when she decides to wear them; they bring her economic freedom when she begins making them as a business. Just as the idiom "wearing the pants in the family" is used to describe someone who is in control, pants help to define and shape Celie's control over her own life.

Letters

The letters are the only escape Celie has in her oppressed life. She writes to God because, as a captive, she is desperate to find an audience or a witness for her pain. Even when she questions whether God is listening, she continues to write to Him as a way to think through her situation. Her letters to Nettie reflect the joy Celie feels that her beloved sister is alive and is leading a life of her choice. Nettie is an actual person with whom Celie can share the harsh realities of her life and her most intimate thoughts. The letters are proof that her sister, if not God, is listening.

God

Although at first God is the only audience to Celie's misery, He becomes her cathartic listening post. Even after Celie loses faith in God and addresses her letters to Nettie, she still closes them with "Amen," until she restores her faith and returns to "Dear God." Shug's spirituality, based on an appreciation of all of God's wonders, combines with Albert's Why questions to lead the characters to deeper understandings of God's love.

Purple

The color purple represents all of the seen and unseen wonders in the world. After Shug explains to Celie that God only wants to be admired for all of the beauty and magnificence He created, she says, "I think it [angers] God if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don't notice it." The author uses purple to represent both the physical grandeur of the world and also the impressive internal and external traits that define each individual.

Needles and Razors

To Celie, needles are a means to create something worthwhile by uniting items that on their own are insignificant. Because they take parts and give them meaning by making a whole, they are a positive force in her life. Needles are used to sew pants, which lead to Celie's success as a seamstress and a business entrepreneur.

Razors, in contrast, represent destruction. When Celie is blinded by her hatred for Mr. ___ because of his abuse, subjugation, and most importantly, because of his purposeful theft of Nettie's letters, she almost kills him with his own razor. The razor becomes the means to rid her life of her oppressor, but the act of violence for which she considers using it would eliminate all the strides she has made toward independence.

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Term:

In "his coy mistress" what does Marvell tell the lady will happen if she does a virgin?

Definition:

She'll lose her virginity to worms

Term:

Paradise Lost

Definition:

1667 Excerpt (V, lines 772-784): Thrones, Dominations, Princedoms, Vertues, Powers, If these magnific Titles yet remain Not meerly titular, since by Decree Another now hath to himself ingross't [ 775 ] All Power, and us eclipst under the name Of King anointed, for whom all this haste Of midnight march, and hurried meeting here, This onely to consult how we may best With what may be devis'd of honours new [ 780 ] Receive him coming to receive from us Knee-tribute yet unpaid, prostration vile, Too much to one, but double how endur'd, To one and to his image now proclaim'd?

Term:

Eve

Definition:

How are we happy, still in fear of harm?

Term:

OF Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit Of that Forbidden Tree, whose mortal taste Brought Death into the World, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat, Sing Heav'nly Muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That Shepherd, who first taught the chosen Seed, In the Beginning how the Heav'ns and Earth Rose out of Chaos: Or if Sion Hill Delight thee more, and Siloa's Brook that flow'd Fast by the Oracle of God; I thence Invoke thy aid to my adventurous Song, That with no middle flight intends to soar Above the Aonian Mount, while it pursues Things unattempted yet in Prose or Rhyme. And chiefly Thou O Spirit, that dost prefer Before all Temples the upright heart and pure, Instruct me, for Thou know'st; Thou from the first Wast present, and with mighty wings outspread Dove-like sat'st brooding on the vast Abyss And mad'st it pregnant: What in me is dark Illumine, what is low raise and support; That to the height of this great Argument I may assert Eternal Providence, And justify the ways of God to men. Say first, for Heav'n hides nothing from thy view Nor the deep Tract of Hell, say first what cause Moved our Grand Parents in that happy State, Favour'd of Heav'n so highly, to fall off From their Creator, and transgress his Will For one restraint, Lords of the World besides? Who first seduc'd them to that foul revolt? Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd The Mother of Mankind, what time his Pride Had cast him out from Heav'n, with all his Host Of Rebel Angels, by whose aid aspiring To set himself in Glory above his Peers, He trusted to have equal'd the most High,

Definition:

 

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