Literature Study GuidesThe Declaration Of Constitutional Principles Southern Manifesto

The Declaration of Constitutional Principles (Southern Manifesto) | Study Guide

United States Congress

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Course Hero. "The Declaration of Constitutional Principles (Southern Manifesto) Study Guide." Course Hero. 30 Aug. 2019. Web. 18 Sep. 2019. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Declaration-of-Constitutional-Principles-Southern-Manifesto/>.

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Course Hero. (2019, August 30). The Declaration of Constitutional Principles (Southern Manifesto) Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved September 18, 2019, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Declaration-of-Constitutional-Principles-Southern-Manifesto/

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Course Hero. "The Declaration of Constitutional Principles (Southern Manifesto) Study Guide." August 30, 2019. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Declaration-of-Constitutional-Principles-Southern-Manifesto/.

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Course Hero, "The Declaration of Constitutional Principles (Southern Manifesto) Study Guide," August 30, 2019, accessed September 18, 2019, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Declaration-of-Constitutional-Principles-Southern-Manifesto/.

Overview

Author

United States Congress

Year Published

1956

Type

Primary Source

Genre

History

At a Glance

  • The Declaration of Constitutional Principles is a statement opposing the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, decisions that ordered the end to segregated public schools.
  • Sometimes called the Southern Manifesto, the Declaration of Constitutional Principles was written by two senators from Southern states and signed by nearly 100 members of Congress from Southern states.
  • In 1954 the court unanimously ruled in Brown I that segregation in public schools was unconstitutional under the 14th Amendment's equal protection clause. In 1955, in Brown II, the court issued a follow-up ruling that ordered school systems to end segregation "with all deliberate speed."
  • The Declaration of Constitutional Principles argued that the court's decision was an abuse of power that allowed the intrusion of the federal government into areas that were rightly matters of state control.
  • The declaration had no legal force, as it was simply a statement of principles and was never voted on in Congress. It did give support to Southern state governments trying to find ways to resist school integration.

Summary

This study guide for United States Congress's The Declaration of Constitutional Principles (Southern Manifesto) offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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