The End of History and the Last Man | Study Guide

Francis Fukuyama

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Course Hero. "The End of History and the Last Man Study Guide." Course Hero. 5 Apr. 2019. Web. 10 Aug. 2020. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-End-of-History-and-the-Last-Man/>.

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Course Hero. "The End of History and the Last Man Study Guide." April 5, 2019. Accessed August 10, 2020. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-End-of-History-and-the-Last-Man/.

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Course Hero, "The End of History and the Last Man Study Guide," April 5, 2019, accessed August 10, 2020, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-End-of-History-and-the-Last-Man/.

The End of History and the Last Man | Part 4, Chapter 26 : Leaping over Rhodes (Toward a Pacific Union) | Summary

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Summary

Fukuyama makes a distinction between the "post-historical" and "historical" world that is developing. Post-history will still be filled with nations, but the logic of market economics and liberalism will increasingly draw these nations together through bonds of trade. The "historical" world, however, will remain "riven with a variety of religious, national, and ideological conflicts." Fukuyama believes these worlds will have "parallel but separate existences," with very little mutual interaction. The only grounds for interaction are oil, immigration, and questions of the "world order"—that is, the regulation of weapons and other technologies possessed by "historical" nations for the good of the world community by "post-historical" democracies. Fukuyama does not think the United Nations is up to this task because it contains too many of the "historical" nations it would seek to regulate. Fukuyama finishes this section by looking ahead to the questions the "end of History" seems to pose to the inhabitants of its societies.

Analysis

Readers may find offensive the distinction between a "historical" and "post-historical" world, especially when migration from one to the other is raised as a "serious problem." Nevertheless, Fukuyama believes this is where the logic of his argument has taken him. The "historic" nations will either reform and achieve "post-historic" status or be left behind by the rest of humanity.

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