The False Promise of International Institutions | Study Guide

John J. Mearsheimer

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The False Promise of International Institutions | Key Figures

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Key Figure Description
John Joseph Mearsheimer John Joseph Mearsheimer (b. 1947) is an international relations theorist who has taught political science at the University of Chicago since 1982. He is currently the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor in the political science department at the University of Chicago. Read More
Richard Ashley Richard Ashley was an associate professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University before retiring in 2018. His research focused on critical theory, and Mearsheimer quotes him in the section that discusses this subject.
Richard Betts Richard Betts (b. 1947) is the Arnold A. Saltzman Professor of War and Peace Studies and director of the international security policy program at Columbia University. Mearsheimer quotes him in the section that addresses whether concerts could be a viable alternative to collective security.
Warren Christopher Warren Christopher (1925–2011) was the U.S. Secretary of State under President William Clinton. Mearsheimer quotes Christopher in the introduction as an example of a prominent political thinker who supported institutionalism.
Inis Claude Inis Claude (1922–2013) was the Stettinius Professor Emeritus of International Relations at the University of Virginia, and his focus was on international relations and international organizations. Mearsheimer cites him as an expert and proponent of collective security theory throughout the section that focuses on that topic.
William Clinton William Jefferson Clinton (b. 1946) was the 42nd president of the United States of America. Mearsheimer quotes him in the introduction as an example of a prominent political thinker who supports institutionalism.
Robert Cox Robert Cox (1926–2018) was born in Canada and was a prominent critical theorist in international relations who taught at Columbia University in New York and York University in Toronto, Ontario. Mearsheimer quotes him in the section that discusses critical theory.
William Durch William Durch is a Distinguished Fellow with the Stimson Center, a former foreign affairs officer with the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and an expert on collective security. Mearsheimer quotes him in the section that discusses the viability of peacekeeping as an alternative to collective security.
Stephen Van Evera Stephen Van Evera is the Ford International Professor in the political science department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mearsheimer cites his views in the section examining whether the flaws in liberal institutionalism can be repaired.
Markus Fischer Markus Fischer is a professor in the Department of Liberal Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at California State University, Fullerton. He is an expert in international relations theory and a prominent proponent of critical theory; Mearsheimer quotes him in the section that discusses the causal logic of critical theory.
Mikhail Gorbachev Mikhail Gorbachev (b. 1931) was the general secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1985 to 1991 and presided over the dissolution of the USSR. Mearsheimer cites him in the section that discusses critical theory.
Joseph Grieco Joseph Grieco is a professor of political science at Duke University, and his focus is on theories of international relations, the international political economy, and problems and conflicts that arise in these areas. Mearsheimer quotes him in the section that examines the flaws in the causal logic of liberal institutionalism.
Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein (1937–2006) was a military dictator and the fifth president of Iraq. The United States military intervened to liberate Kuwait from Iraqi rule under Hussein.
Robert Jervis Robert Jervis (b. 1940) is the Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Politics at Columbia University. His focus is on security issues in international relations, and Mearsheimer cites his views in the section addressing whether the flaws in liberal institutionalism can be repaired.
George Kennan George Kennan (1904–2005) was an American diplomat and historian who successfully advocated a containment policy to defeat the expansion of the Soviet government after World War II. Mearsheimer cites him as an authoritative political realist in the conclusion.
Robert Keohane Robert Keohane (b. 1941) is an American political scientist, international relations theorist, and prominent proponent of liberal institutionalism. Mearsheimer cites his views throughout, particularly in the section that analyzes liberal institutionalism.
Henry Kissinger Henry Kissinger (b. 1923) is a German-born American political scientist who served as an advisor for national security affairs and as secretary of state under Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. Mearsheimer cites him as an authoritative political realist in the conclusion.
Stephan Krasner Stephen Krasner (b. 1942) is the Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations at Stanford University, a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. His research focuses on sovereignty, American foreign policy, and international economic relations.
Charles Kupchan Charles Kupchan (b. 1958) is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a professor of international affairs at Georgetown University. Mearsheimer cites Kupchan's views in the section that discusses the viability of using concerts as an alternative to collective security.
Clifford Kupchan Clifford Kupchan is the chairman of the Eurasia Group and an expert on international relations, often advising top government officials around the world. Mearsheimer cites Kupchan's views in the section discussing the viability of using concerts as an alternative to collective security.
Anthony Lake Anthony Lake (b. 1939) was the U.S. national security advisor under President William Clinton. Mearsheimer quotes him in the introduction as an example of a prominent political thinker who supports institutionalism.
Charles Lipson Charles Lipson (b. 1948) is the Peter B. Ritzma Professor in Political Science at the University of Chicago. He is an international relations theorist whose research focuses on cooperation and conflict among states in the international system and on the political aspects of the world economy.
Lisa Martin Lisa Martin is a professor of international relations and political methodology in the Department of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Mearsheimer cites her views in the section that examines the empirical record relating to liberal institutionalism.
Michael Mastanduno Michael Mastanduno (b. 1956) is the dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Dartmouth College and an international relations theorist and political scientist whose focus is on U.S. foreign policy after the Cold War. Mearsheimer cites his views in the section that analyzes the flaws in the logic of liberal institutionalism.
Hans Morgenthau Hans Morgenthau (1904–80) was a German-born American political scientist, international relations theorist, and prominent proponent of realism. His views exerted considerable influence over the development of Mearsheimer's thinking, and Mearsheimer cites Morgenthau's views on realism in the conclusion.
Pol Pot Pol Pot (1925–98) was born Saloth Sar and became the leader of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia from 1975 through 1979, during which time he imposed severe, violent repression on the Cambodian people. Mearsheimer cites him in the section that discusses the potential obstacles to implementing an effective collective security apparatus.
Robert Powell Robert Powell is a professor of political science at the University of California, Berkeley, and his research encompasses mathematical modeling, rational choice theory—a school of thought based on the assumption that most decisions are motivated by personal preference—and international conflict. Mearsheimer cites him in the section that addresses whether the flaws in liberal institutionalism can be repaired.
George Quester George Quester is an international relations theorist who has written about nuclear proliferation. Mearsheimer cites Quester's views in the section examining whether the flaws in liberal institutionalism can be repaired.
Thomas Risse-Kappen Thomas Risse-Kappen (b. 1955) is a German international relations scholar who has written about international alliances among democracies. Mearsheimer quotes him in the section that discusses the flaws in the causal logic of critical theory.
John Ruggie John Ruggie (b. 1944) is the Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and affiliated professor in international legal studies at Harvard Law. Ruggie is an international relations theorist who has focused on the impact of globalization on global rulemaking.
Duncan Snidal Duncan Snidal is a professor of international relations and fellow of Nuffield College and the British Academy. His research focus is on international cooperation and institutions, and Mearsheimer cites him in the section that addresses whether the flaws in liberal institutionalism can be repaired.
Jack Snyder Jack Snyder (b. 1951) is the Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Relations in the political science department and the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. Mearsheimer cites his views in the section that examines whether the flaws in liberal institutionalism can be repaired.
Kenneth Waltz Kenneth Waltz (1924–2013) was an American political scientist and international relations theorist who was a prominent proponent of realism and originated the theory of neorealism. He exerted considerable influence over the development of Mearsheimer's views, and Mearsheimer cites him initially in the section that defines the theory of realism.
Alexander Wendt Alexander Wendt (b. 1958) is Mershon Professor of International Security and professor of political science at Ohio State University. His research focus is on international relations theory, international legal theory, and international political theory.
Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924) was the 28th president of the United States of America. He founded the League of Nations, and Mearsheimer cites him as an example of a prominent political thinker who supported institutionalism.
Quincy Wright Quincy Wright (1890–1970) was an American political scientist. During his lifetime he was regarded as an authority on international law, and Mearsheimer quotes him in the section that examines the viability of concerts as an alternative to collective security.
Boris Yeltsin Boris Yeltsin (1931–2007) became the first democratically elected Russian in the country's history. Mearsheimer cites him in the section that discusses critical theory.
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