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The Fault in Our Stars | Study Guide

John Green

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Course Hero. "The Fault in Our Stars Study Guide." Course Hero. 3 Oct. 2017. Web. 21 Feb. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Fault-in-Our-Stars/>.

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Course Hero. (2017, October 3). The Fault in Our Stars Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved February 21, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Fault-in-Our-Stars/

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(Course Hero, 2017)

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Bibliography

Course Hero. "The Fault in Our Stars Study Guide." October 3, 2017. Accessed February 21, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Fault-in-Our-Stars/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "The Fault in Our Stars Study Guide," October 3, 2017, accessed February 21, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Fault-in-Our-Stars/.

Overview

The Fault in Our Stars infographic thumbnail

Author

John Green

Year Published

2012

Type

Novel

Genre

Drama, Romance

Perspective and Narrator

The Fault in Our Stars is narrated in the first person by Hazel Grace Lancaster, a 16-year-old girl diagnosed with stage IV thyroid cancer and metastatic tumors in her lungs. The perspective is limited to Hazel's thoughts and descriptions about other people and events that occur, inviting a strong emotional connection between the reader and the character.

Tense

The Fault in Our Stars is narrated in the present tense.

About the Title

The Fault in Our Stars references a line from the play Julius Caesar by British playwright William Shakespeare: "The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars / But in ourselves, that we are underlings." The quotation comes from a scene in which the conspirator Cassius attempts to convince co-conspirator Brutus that their political problem is not a result of fate but instead of human error or their own weak positions. However, the quotation is often understood differently in more modern contexts to mean that human problems are not caused by people's errors but the whims of fate. In this novel John Green also indicates that bad things happen to good people for no other reason than fate or chance.

Summary

This study guide and infographic for John Green's The Fault in Our Stars offer summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents, Q&A pairs, and flashcards created by students and educators.

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