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Course Hero, "The Feminine Mystique Study Guide," August 11, 2017, accessed November 15, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Feminine-Mystique/.

The Feminine Mystique | Glossary

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balanced homemaker: a category developed by advertisers: the balanced homemaker has abilities, learned during her working experience before her marriage, to effectively manage her household. She is the ideal consumer because she trusts the efficiency of mechanical appliances.

career woman: a category developed for advertising purposes: from a seller's standpoint, an "unhealthy" minority. According to Betty Friedan, "Advertisers were warned not to let this group get any larger."

first-wave feminism: a term for 19th-century and early-20th-century social movements focused on suffrage and opportunities for women. Mid-19th-century activists included temperance crusaders and abolitionists.

functionalism: an approach to research data by cultural anthropologists in the 1950s in which subjects are studied in relation to their function within their own culture.

identity crisis: defined by Erik Erikson as the necessary crisis in adolescence. An identity crisis is a personal rebellion that enables growth and the turn toward adult independence. In the context of post–World War ll femininity, the crisis is that a girl does not have a crisis; instead, femininity's prescribed roles (wife, mother, and homemaker) account for the failure of individuality and predictable neuroses.

NOW: NOW is the acronym for the National Organization of Women, founded in 1966 by Betty Friedan and Pauli Murray. The impetus was the federal government's failure to enforce Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to end discrimination in the workplace.

second-wave feminism: a term for the revival of activism with regard to women's rights in the 1960s and continuing into the 1990s. Erupting in the context of the antiwar and civil rights movements, the second wave focused on passing the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution and grew increasingly radical in its demands for reproductive rights and sexual equality across all walks of life.

sex-directed education: Widely practiced in the 1950s and 1960s in American high schools and universities, a sex-directed education was a curriculum designed with sex roles in mind. Courses with less intellectual content and more practical applications, such as "Family Life and Management" or "Dating Dos and Don'ts," were offered to girls.

true housewife type: a category developed for advertising purposes: 51 percent of American women, for whom housekeeping was the dominant interest, were prime targets of ad campaigns in the 1950s.

balanced homemaker: a category developed by advertisers: the balanced homemaker has abilities, learned during her working experience before her marriage, to effectively manage her household. She is the ideal consumer because she trusts the efficiency of mechanical appliances.

career woman: a category developed for advertising purposes: from a seller's standpoint, an "unhealthy" minority. According to Betty Friedan, "Advertisers were warned not to let this group get any larger."

first-wave feminism: a term for 19th-century and early-20th-century social movements focused on suffrage and opportunities for women. Mid-19th-century activists included temperance crusaders and abolitionists.

functionalism: an approach to research data by cultural anthropologists in the 1950s in which subjects are studied in relation to their function within their own culture.

identity crisis: defined by Erik Erikson as the necessary crisis in adolescence. An identity crisis is a personal rebellion that enables growth and the turn toward adult independence. In the context of post–World War ll femininity, the crisis is that a girl does not have a crisis; instead, femininity's prescribed roles (wife, mother, and homemaker) account for the failure of individuality and predictable neuroses.

NOW: NOW is the acronym for the National Organization of Women, founded in 1966 by Betty Friedan and Pauli Murray. The impetus was the federal government's failure to enforce Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to end discrimination in the workplace.

second-wave feminism: a term for the revival of activism with regard to women's rights in the 1960s and continuing into the 1990s. Erupting in the context of the antiwar and civil rights movements, the second wave focused on passing the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution and grew increasingly radical in its demands for reproductive rights and sexual equality across all walks of life.

sex-directed education: Widely practiced in the 1950s and 1960s in American high schools and universities, a sex-directed education was a curriculum designed with sex roles in mind. Courses with less intellectual content and more practical applications, such as "Family Life and Management" or "Dating Dos and Don'ts," were offered to girls.

true housewife type: a category developed for advertising purposes: 51 percent of American women, for whom housekeeping was the dominant interest, were prime targets of ad campaigns in the 1950s.

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