The Girl on the Train | Study Guide

Paula Hawkins

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Course Hero. "The Girl on the Train Study Guide." Course Hero. 3 Aug. 2017. Web. 22 Sep. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Girl-on-the-Train/>.

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Course Hero. (2017, August 3). The Girl on the Train Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved September 22, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Girl-on-the-Train/

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Course Hero. "The Girl on the Train Study Guide." August 3, 2017. Accessed September 22, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Girl-on-the-Train/.

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Course Hero, "The Girl on the Train Study Guide," August 3, 2017, accessed September 22, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Girl-on-the-Train/.

The Girl on the Train | Anna (Chapter 20) | Summary

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Summary

On Wednesday, August 7, 2013, Anna finds out the story about Megan's dead baby while she is at a play date with friends in a coffee shop and leaves abruptly.

That evening she fights with Tom because she wants to leave the house and the neighborhood. She wants to get away from Rachel's constant harassment and from memories of Megan holding her baby, but Tom doesn't want to move.

Analysis

Anna's shallowness shows when she is as concerned about the other mother's opinion of her for hiring Megan, a supposed baby killer, as she is about the fact that she let Megan actually care for her child. Her quick judgment of Megan based solely on a sensational newspaper article stands in stark contrast to the insights in Rachel's point of view in the last chapter. While Rachel's point of view warns of the rush to judgment, Anna instead rushes to judgment. She has no interest in or sympathy for Megan's side of the story but instead only cares about how the story affects her own life. In retrospect fearful for her baby's well-being in Megan's care, she wants to leave the neighborhood to get away from bad memories. In a case of dramatic irony, this is precisely why Megan ended up in the neighborhood: wanting to get away from memories of her life with Mac and their baby, she moved to London, where she met Scott, who brought her to the suburbs. Anna has more in common with Megan than she'd care to admit.

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