The Girl on the Train | Study Guide

Paula Hawkins

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Course Hero. "The Girl on the Train Study Guide." Course Hero. 3 Aug. 2017. Web. 15 Dec. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Girl-on-the-Train/>.

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APA

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Course Hero. (2017, August 3). The Girl on the Train Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved December 15, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Girl-on-the-Train/

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Course Hero. "The Girl on the Train Study Guide." August 3, 2017. Accessed December 15, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Girl-on-the-Train/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "The Girl on the Train Study Guide," August 3, 2017, accessed December 15, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Girl-on-the-Train/.

The Girl on the Train | Rachel (Chapter 31) | Summary

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Summary

On Sunday, August 18, 2013, Rachel finds Anna in the backyard of her house and approaches. Much to her surprise, Anna does not yell at her, instead calmly stating that Tom is out with his friends from the army. Rachel tells her that they need to leave, but Anna laughs.

Analysis

For the very first time Rachel's arrival at Tom and Anna's house does not trigger Anna's anger or frustration. This seems to suggest that she has finally admitted that Rachel is no danger to her family and never was; instead, the danger to her family is her husband. And yet, although Rachel urges her to come with her, she does not want to leave. To Rachel and the reader Anna's laughter does not make immediate sense. Does this mean that perhaps the woman on the phone was not Megan after all?

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