Literature Study GuidesThe Lord Of The RingsThe Return Of The King Book 6 Chapter 4 Summary

The Lord of the Rings | Study Guide

J.R.R. Tolkien

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The Lord of the Rings | The Return of the King (Book 6, Chapter 4) : The Field of Cormallen | Summary

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Summary

As Aragorn and his forces are nearly overcome, Gandalf calls out, "The Eagles are coming!" The Eagles engage the Nazgûl in battle, but the Nazgûl suddenly fly away. There is a great earthquake, and as Mordor begins to crumble, Gandalf announces that Frodo has completed the quest. Then he quickly sends the Eagles to rescue Frodo and Sam, who are surprised to wake up safe in Ithilien, and even more surprised to find out Aragorn is now a king. There is a great celebration, after which Gandalf, Merry, Pippin, Legolas, and Gimli have a chat with Frodo and Sam, and catch up on all the adventures. They camp for a time on the Field of Cormallen, then travel back to Minas Tirith.

Analysis

The destruction of the Ring means the destruction of Mordor, because the Ring contained within it a great deal of Sauron's power, and this power had been used to build Mordor into a nearly impenetrable land.

Even though he thinks death is near, Sam is satisfied with the outcome of their "story," although he had one regret: "What a tale we have been in, Mr. Frodo, haven't we? ... I wish I could hear it told!" Tolkien grants Sam's wish by having a minstrel do just that: "For I will sing to you of Frodo of the Nine Fingers and the Ring of Doom."

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