The Pickwick Papers | Study Guide

Charles Dickens

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "The Pickwick Papers Study Guide." Course Hero. 14 June 2017. Web. 16 July 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Pickwick-Papers/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2017, June 14). The Pickwick Papers Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved July 16, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Pickwick-Papers/

In text

(Course Hero, 2017)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "The Pickwick Papers Study Guide." June 14, 2017. Accessed July 16, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Pickwick-Papers/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "The Pickwick Papers Study Guide," June 14, 2017, accessed July 16, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Pickwick-Papers/.

The Pickwick Papers | Chapter 55 | Summary

Share
Share

Summary

Sam and his father meet with Mr. Pell, the lawyer from the Insolvent Court whom we encountered in Chapter 43, to wrap up the affairs of the late Mrs. Weller. This simple will requires, under Pell's management, several trips to Doctors' Commons, a civil law court which dealt with probate issues, as well as visits to and notices from other offices. By the time Mr. Weller and Sam receive the property, the one-page will has turned into a "mass of papers."

Analysis

For the first time in the novel, a lawyer does precisely what his client wants. Mr. Pell takes Mrs. Weller's will through probate, obtains the money for his client, and helps his client manage the money. As Mr. Weller and Sam are not well-versed in probate law or financial investment, there are a number of humorous misunderstandings along the way, but the humor does not conceal the fundamental fact that Dickens still didn't trust lawyers. As the narrator comments toward the end of the chapter, the Weller will "was by very many degrees the best professional job [Mr. Pell] had ever had, and one on which he boarded, lodged, and washed, for six months afterwards." Even a good lawyer with a smart client (in this case, Sam and his father) manages to find a way to make so much money off one small case that he could live off it for six months.

Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about The Pickwick Papers? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!