Literature Study GuidesThe ShiningPart 5 Chapter 43 Summary

The Shining | Study Guide

Stephen King

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The Shining | Part 5, Chapter 43 : Matters of Life and Death, Drinks on the House | Summary

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Summary

Jack arrives in the Colorado Lounge as the Overlook comes to life, and the bar is full of people. Jack greets Lloyd, and Lloyd greets him. Jack orders a martini, and Lloyd says it's on the house, "Orders from the manager." Lloyd explains the manager has a special interest Danny, "a talented boy." Jack wonders what they could possibly want with Danny. Jack thinks they want him (Jack), and that Wendy and Danny aren't part of what's happening in the Overlook. Jack asks Lloyd where the manager is, but Lloyd only urges him to drink up.

Jack looks behind him and sees Horace Derwent with a woman whose dress is falling off. Jack protests he wants to see the manager; Danny isn't part of this. The other bar patrons tell Jack, "Drink your drink." Jack follows the command and asks for another. His mood brightens, and Jack resolves he will not hurt Danny again, "Not for the world."

Analysis

Jack's previous visit to the Colorado Lounge took place in a zone between fantasy and supernatural reality. This visit is firmly planted in the supernatural reality of the Overlook's world. Lloyd the bartender has his own lines of quoted dialogue, which means he really responds to Jack. The other guests in the bar don't fade in and out of visibility.

Jack proves his conscience isn't completely dissolved where his family is concerned. He peppers Lloyd with questions about the "manager" and his intentions for Danny. He seems resistant to the idea of turning over his son to this nebulous manager figure. The guests and Lloyd insist Jack abandon these questions and drink his drink. As far as the Overlook is concerned, Jack has been given the thing he wants—a drink—so he has no need or right to ask questions about their intentions.

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