The Spanish Tragedy | Study Guide

Thomas Kyd

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Course Hero. "The Spanish Tragedy Study Guide." Course Hero. 25 May 2017. Web. 23 May 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Spanish-Tragedy/>.

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Course Hero. (2017, May 25). The Spanish Tragedy Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved May 23, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Spanish-Tragedy/

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Course Hero. "The Spanish Tragedy Study Guide." May 25, 2017. Accessed May 23, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Spanish-Tragedy/.

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Course Hero, "The Spanish Tragedy Study Guide," May 25, 2017, accessed May 23, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Spanish-Tragedy/.

The Spanish Tragedy | Act 4, Scene 2 | Summary

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Summary

Isabella enters the garden with a "weapon" and in a fit of despair and anger tries to utterly destroy the tree from which her son had been hanged. Once she has done as much damage as she can to the tree, she turns the weapon (assumed to be a knife) and stabs herself to death.

Analysis

One of the worst sins a person could commit against God was to commit suicide, thereby destroying God's own creation. The part of Dante's Inferno to which the suicides fell was one of the deeper regions along Dante's journey with his guide Virgil. There, suicides existed as barren brambles which the Furies would attack periodically and break the branches. When the branches were broken, they bled blood; but this was also the only way these damned souls could speak to tell Dante their stories.

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