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The Three Musketeers | Quotes

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1.

Endure nothing from anyone except Monsieur the Cardinal and the king.


M. d'Artagnan the elder, Chapter 1

D'Artagnan's father's advice sets the tone of the novel. D'Artagnan must prove his loyalty to the two leaders of France and defend his honor against all others.

2.

You said you were but three, but it appears to me we are four.


D'Artagnan, Chapter 5

D'Artagnan aligns himself with the Musketeers, guards of the king, enemies of the cardinal and his guards. He means to join the three men in the fight against Jussac's men, and an instant friendship is forged.

3.

All for one, one for all.


D'Artagnan, Chapter 9

D'Artagnan proposes a motto, and the four friends swear loyalty and unity to each other against the cardinal.

4.

Every time I see you is a fresh diamond which I enclose in the casket of my heart.


Duke of Buckingham, Chapter 12

The duke tells the queen he treasures each of their brief meetings like a diamond, prompting her to give him real diamonds in a box as a token of her love. The cardinal tries to expose the affair by having the king challenge the queen to wear the diamonds.

5.

Ah, Monsieur Bonacieux, I never did love you much, but now it is worse than ever. I hate you, and on my word you shall pay for this!


Mme. Bonacieux, Chapter 17

Mme. Bonacieux, speaking aloud to herself, confesses that her apathy for her husband has grown to hatred because of his new devotion to the cardinal. She never acts on this threat of revenge but believes the queen could. This disavowal of her husband also opens the door to a romance with d'Artagnan.

6.

Mistrust everything, in short, even your own shadow.


Athos, Chapter 38

Athos warns d'Artagnan his life will be in constant peril now that he has crossed Milady; her plans for revenge have escalated to murdering d'Artagnan.

7.

It is by my order and for the good of the state that the bearer of this has done what he has done.


Cardinal Richelieu, Chapter 45

The cardinal writes a "carte blanche" for Milady to kill d'Artagnan and escape punishment. Athos takes it from her. After Milady's execution, d'Artagnan uses it when the cardinal calls him an assassin.

8.

I thought I had crushed you, madame; but either I was deceived or hell has resuscitated you!


Athos, Chapter 45

When Athos confronts Milady, he calls her a demon and says he thought he had killed her. Did she only pretend to be dead, or did hell bring her back to life?

9.

Strike, save England, save thyself—for thou wilt die without having appeased God!


Felton, Chapter 55

Felton quotes the angel in his dreams who tells him to kill the duke to save England from immorality and to please God. This is the vision of a religious martyr: he will strike and die, earning his place in heaven.

10.

She is not dead; demons do not die so easily.


Lord de Winter, Chapter 57

Lord de Winter is not persuaded by Milady's fake attempt to take her life. He knows she will continue to survive and reinvent herself.

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