The Two Gentlemen of Verona | Study Guide

William Shakespeare

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "The Two Gentlemen of Verona Study Guide." Course Hero. 11 Dec. 2017. Web. 25 May 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Two-Gentlemen-of-Verona/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2017, December 11). The Two Gentlemen of Verona Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved May 25, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Two-Gentlemen-of-Verona/

In text

(Course Hero, 2017)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "The Two Gentlemen of Verona Study Guide." December 11, 2017. Accessed May 25, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Two-Gentlemen-of-Verona/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "The Two Gentlemen of Verona Study Guide," December 11, 2017, accessed May 25, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Two-Gentlemen-of-Verona/.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona | Act 4, Scene 3 | Summary

Share
Share

Summary

Eglamour, a knight unfortunate in love, comes to the ducal palace in response to a summons from Sylvia. She asks for his help in escaping from Milan so she may reunite with Valentine. Her father, she concedes, will be furious when he learns of her escape, but the alternative is "a most unholy match" with Thurio, whom she despises. Pitying Sylvia's plight, Eglamour promises to meet her that evening at a nearby abbey, where she is going to have her confession heard.

Analysis

Eglamour, a minor character, was mentioned briefly in Act 1, Scene 2, when Lucetta named him as a potential suitor for Julia. Now living in or near Milan he has evidently believed the rumor of Julia's demise, a lie circulated by Proteus for his own selfish ends. Believing his true love to be dead, the devoted Eglamour has sworn a vow of chastity and now regards himself as having nothing left to lose. This vow, combined with his kindhearted nature and reputation for chivalrous conduct, makes Eglamour the perfect person to escort Sylvia on her dangerous escape from Milan.

Important in this scene is Sylvia's active defiance of her father and refusal to be coerced into marrying "vain Thurio, whom my very soul abhorred." In fact both Julia and Sylvia are asserting themselves as strong and persistent women who take action to achieve their desires.

Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about The Two Gentlemen of Verona? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!

Ask a homework question - tutors are online