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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

L. Frank Baum

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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | Chapter 13 : The Rescue | Summary

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Summary

The Winkies—freed from their bondage to the Wicked Witch—are happy to help rescue and repair the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow. After taking a few days to relax, Dorothy and her friends say goodbye and set out for Oz, carrying the precious gifts the Winkies have given them.

Always practical, Dorothy has already gone to the kitchen at the witch's palace to get food for the trip. There she spies the Golden Cap, which—to her surprise—fits her perfectly. Dorothy decides to carry her sunbonnet and wear the Golden Cap instead.

Analysis

Because the Tin Woodman's repairs will clearly take time, Baum suspends the action. Considering that this leaves Dorothy a few days to wait around, the reader may wonder why Baum didn't create something for her to do. But since the previous chapter and the one that follows have more than enough action, Chapter 13 has the function of resting and relaxing the reader as well as Dorothy and her friends.

In keeping with his promise to avoid "horrible and blood-curdling incidents," Baum doesn't dwell on the condition of the Tin Woodman and Scarecrow until they've been repaired. They were never dead, it seems, but only out of commission for a little while.

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