Troilus and Cressida | Study Guide

William Shakespeare

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Course Hero. "Troilus and Cressida Study Guide." Course Hero. 7 Apr. 2018. Web. 23 Sep. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Troilus-and-Cressida/>.

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Course Hero. (2018, April 7). Troilus and Cressida Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved September 23, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Troilus-and-Cressida/

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Course Hero. "Troilus and Cressida Study Guide." April 7, 2018. Accessed September 23, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Troilus-and-Cressida/.

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Course Hero, "Troilus and Cressida Study Guide," April 7, 2018, accessed September 23, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Troilus-and-Cressida/.

Troilus and Cressida | Act 4, Scene 3 | Summary

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Summary

In this brief scene Paris asks Troilus to bring Cressida so she can be delivered to the Greeks. Troilus sadly comments he will give her into the Greek's hand as "a priest there off'ring to it his own heart."

Analysis

The political plot finally merges with the romantic plot. Troilus is heartsick at the idea of turning Cressida over to the Greeks. Paris says he knows what it is like to be in love and wishes there were something that could be done. Coming from the man who started the Trojan War in the first place by stealing another man's wife, these comments ring false. This is especially true after Diomedes's damning speech regarding the nature of the war, Helen, Menelaus, and Paris, something Shakespeare wrote to further skewer the epic hero narrative.

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