Course Hero Logo

United States Constitution | Study Guide

Various Authors

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "United States Constitution Study Guide." Course Hero. 13 Apr. 2018. Web. 30 Jan. 2023. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/United-States-Constitution/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2018, April 13). United States Constitution Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved January 30, 2023, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/United-States-Constitution/

In text

(Course Hero, 2018)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "United States Constitution Study Guide." April 13, 2018. Accessed January 30, 2023. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/United-States-Constitution/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "United States Constitution Study Guide," April 13, 2018, accessed January 30, 2023, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/United-States-Constitution/.

United States Constitution | Article 5 | Summary

Share
Share

Summary

Article 5 outlines the way constitutional amendments may be made. With a two-thirds vote from both the House and the Senate, Congress may propose an amendment. Additionally, two-thirds of the states may call for a constitutional convention to propose an amendment. Then three-fourths of the states must vote for the amendment for it to be ratified. Two specific issues are forbidden as amendments, however: taking away any state's representation in the Senate and banning the slave trade prior to the 1808 expiry laid out in Article 1.

Analysis

There have been 27 amendments ratified since the creation of the Constitution. All 27 were proposed in the same way—by a two-thirds vote in Congress. All but one were ratified by a three-quarters vote in Congress. The only amendment to be ratified in the alternative way, the three-quarters vote in a state constitutional convention, was the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition in 1933.

Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about United States Constitution? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!