Literature Study GuidesWhite FangPart 5 Chapter 21 Summary

White Fang | Study Guide

Jack London

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Course Hero. (2017, May 11). White Fang Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved December 15, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/White-Fang/

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Course Hero. "White Fang Study Guide." May 11, 2017. Accessed December 15, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/White-Fang/.

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Course Hero, "White Fang Study Guide," May 11, 2017, accessed December 15, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/White-Fang/.

White Fang | Part 5, Chapter 21 : The Tame (The Long Trail) | Summary

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Summary

White Fang senses things are about to change long before the changes take effect. Weedon and Matt notice a change in the wolf, who once again skulks around the cabin, whining, eating less, and rushing underfoot when Weedon leaves. White Fang seems to know Weedon plans to leave, and the wolf's pining thoroughly depresses his master. Weedon considers bringing White Fang back to California with him, but Matt reminds him that California is no place for a wolf. The next day, Weedon packs up his belongings and heads to the waiting steamboat. Before leaving, he says goodbye to White Fang and locks him in the cabin. As Weedon climbs aboard the boat, White Fang appears at his feet. He realizes the wolf leapt through the window glass to be with him, and that he cannot leave his companion behind. He decides to take White Fang to California.

Analysis

White Fang dedicates himself completely to his new master. With Gray Beaver, White Fang escaped but returned when he realized he missed the safety and security of camp life, no matter what consequences he would face. With Weedon, White Fang's desire to be with his master stems from a sense of love or belonging in much the same way he chased after Kiche when she was sent away. In Chapter 10, White Fang endured horrific beatings to stick with his mother, and in Chapter 21, he further proves no barriers will keep him away from love by leaping through a window. This act convinces Weedon that, despite White Fang's savage instincts, his dedication and intelligence will allow him to be domesticated.

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