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Course Hero. "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Study Guide." Course Hero. 28 July 2016. Web. 22 Nov. 2017. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Whos-Afraid-of-Virginia-Woolf/>.

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Course Hero. (2016, July 28). Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved November 22, 2017, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Whos-Afraid-of-Virginia-Woolf/

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Course Hero. "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Study Guide." July 28, 2016. Accessed November 22, 2017. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Whos-Afraid-of-Virginia-Woolf/.

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Course Hero, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Study Guide," July 28, 2016, accessed November 22, 2017, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Whos-Afraid-of-Virginia-Woolf/.

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? | Quotes

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1.

I swear ... if you existed, I'd divorce you.


Martha , Act 1, Fun and Games (Section 3)

This quote relates to the theme of illusion versus reality, as Martha and George have constructed a life built on lies.

2.

Alas, Martha, in reality it works out that the sacrifice is usually of a somewhat more private portion of the anatomy.


George , Act 1, Fun and Games (Section 4)

George is referring to the fact that Martha's attacks on him have robbed him of his manhood. He is emasculated, without power.

3.

Just don't shoot your mouth off ... about ... you-know-what.


George , Act 1, Fun and Games (Section 4)

George is warning Martha not to reveal their private illusion about having a son. This foreshadows the climax of the play, when George "kills off" their son in a car accident.

4.

Musical beds is the faculty sport around here.


George , Act 1, Fun and Games (Section 4)

George is mocking the loose sexual standards at the college.

5.

A boxing match? The two of you?


Nick , Act 1, Fun and Games (Section 5)

Martha punched George right in the jaw while they were boxing, and he fell into a bush. She publicly humiliates him, adding physical abuse to her mental abuse.

6.

It was a hysterical pregnancy.


Nick , Act 2, Walpurgisnacht (Section 1)

Honey had a false pregnancy, which relates to the theme of children. While most women in the 1960s wanted to have children in order to be considered complete and happy, Honey is ambivalent about having children.

7.

When they told him his father was dead, he began to laugh.


George , Act 2, Walpurgisnacht (Section 2)

George ends his story about a boy who accidentally shot his mother by revealing that the boy later killed his father, also by accident, and then went insane. The boy who killed his parents may or may not be George, another element in the theme of illusion versus reality.

8.

There's quicksand here, and you'll be dragged down.


George , Act 2, Walpurgisnacht (Section 3)

George is warning Nick about how marriage and society will drag him down and make him lose his manhood and self-respect.

9.

I'm loud, and I'm vulgar, and I wear the pants in this house because somebody's got to, but I am not a monster.


George , Act 2, Walpurgisnacht (Section 5)

Martha is defending the fact that she takes on traditionally masculine roles in the marriage, which would have been considered "unfeminine" in the 1960s.

10.

He was ... killed ... late in the afternoon.


George , Act 3, The Exorcism (Section 2)

George "kills off" their imaginary son, symbolically killing off the illusions that have sustained George and Martha's marriage. Now they will have to face reality.

11.

Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf. I ... am ... George.


Martha , Act 3, The Exorcism (Section 2)

Martha is afraid of living a life without illusions and facing reality.

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