Executive Branch Bureaucracy of the United States

Government Corporations in the United States

Government corporations such as Amtrak serve the public, are owned by the government, and are tied to a revenue stream.
A government corporation, a fourth category of entities in the executive branch bureaucracy, is a business that serves a public purpose and is owned or partly owned by the government. Although government corporations are exceptionally diverse, they have two important structural features in common. First, they are usually enterprises tied to a revenue stream: that is, they are agencies in fields or endeavors that can raise money. Secondly, government corporations, like corporations in the business world, are typically run by a board of directors.

Major U.S. Government Corporations

Corporation Name Year Established Purpose
Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) 1933 Provides flood control, navigation, and electricity to the Tennessee Valley region, which includes all or part of seven states in the Southeast; founded as part of the New Deal to respond to the Great Depression
Export-Import Bank 1934 Finance and promote American exports of goods and services, particularly when commercial banks decline to finance transactions because of risk factors
National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) 1971 Provides medium- and long-distance intercity rail service in the continental United States
U.S. Postal Service 1971 Handles mail and package delivery across the United States